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Tipperary Casualties of the Great War – Book Of The Month

Those of us who have tried to trace personnel killed, missing or injured during World War One will have found this task difficult, to say the least. However, now, for those of you searching for information on Tipperary soldiers the task has become much easier, due to the publication of a new book entitled “Tipperary Casualties of the Great War”

The author, Dublin born Tom Burnell, now resident in Holycross, Thurles, Co.Tipperary, has penned a remarkable factual history of all the Tipperary men who died during World War One or just after, while in the service of the British,  Australian, New Zealand, American, Indian, Canadian, South African armies. Details of those Tipperary men linked with the Royal Navy and the British Mercantile Marine are also detailed.

This book, painstakingly and accurately brings to light, for the first time, information previously held on dusty shelves in forgotten archives and reminds us of the true meaning of sacrifice.

In an interview with Thurles.Info the author Tom Burnell speaks about his early life and times and what inspired this much needed and very readable publication.

“I consider myself, indeed, blessed to live here in the most beautiful rural village of Holycross, County Tipperary, one of Irelands most holy places. This village is a peaceful location and so remote from the many wartime locations, now household names, found in Europe.

burnell1

Yet even in this peaceful place, there are the ‘graves of the fallen‘ from the Great War of 1914 -1918. Indeed, there are few places in Ireland that do not contain the resting-place of at least one such serviceman. Some came home wounded and died here, while others may have died in England of wounds received in France, the Dardanelles or Flanders. Over 400 of the 1400 Tipperary men who fell in this conflict have no graves at all and their commemorations remain as small inscriptions on Memorials to the Missing in foreign lands. They fell while in the service of the British, the Canadian, the Australian Imperial Force (A. I. F.), the South African, the Indian, the New Zealand and the American Armies. Some were sailors serving in one of several navies including the British Mercantile marine.

I was born in Finglas in the 1950s, long after the Great War had ended. Like most Dubliners, I was the offspring of a Dublin mother and a father, latter  from far outside the Pale and known in Dublin as a ‘Culchie’.  My father originated from a little place called Camas, in County Galway, close to Meelick, Eyrecourt.

In the late 1940s, after the Second World War, he gave up the drudgery of farming life. At that time our family was farming and also selling turf cut from the Meelick bogs and sent by canal barge to Dublin. It was here they obtained the best price. In the summer of ‘49 he left his plough stuck in a furrow and with a fiver in his pocket headed off  for the Capital City, Dublin. Here there was a chance of some future, more work and more music. My father was a talented musician and soon formed the Galway Rovers Céili Band with the world famous Joe Cooley. He also got a job with the Lucan Dairies and afterwards with Kennedy’s Bread in Parnell Street opposite the ‘Hill’ Saturday morning market.

In the 1950s Finglas was still rural and surrounded by farms and fields and lots and lots of places for a kid to explore. The village was a small place with one shop, a post office, a bank, a church, a few pubs, a dentist and a few other shops, the details of which now escape my memory. However I do remember playing music in The Duck Inn opposite The Drake Inn and I played here years afterwards with the music I had inherited from my Dad.

In those days it was customary for Roman Catholic families like ourselves to kneel down each evening and say the Rosary and as my father had a special devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary this was included in our nightly devotions. It’s well I remember the whole family, my parents, four brothers and two sisters, kneeling down in front of high backed wooden chairs, saying the decades of the Rosary just before bedtime. The coal fire burned bright in the corporation tiled fireplace grate, burning our backs as we studied our shadows on the wall and counting each decade on our fingers.

At the end of it all my father would invite each of us to add our own special dedication of three Hail Mary’s to anything we liked. I don’t remember any of my siblings particular dedications, but what still remains vivid in my mind is the special dedication of three prayers that I specifically wanted to be said. Indeed, I was most insistent  I wanted three Hail Mary’s said for all the soldiers who died in battle (no matter where that battle was or which side they were on) who had no-one to say a prayer for them when they took their last breath. As a child I could not understand why a soldier about to die, without a priest to say the final absolution or the last rites, could not die ‘proper’. Did that mean that men who died on the battlefield without the last rites would never see heaven?

I remember my Father initially staying silent for a short while absorbing my request. I am sure he remembered his Granny sticking the long handled fire shovel into the roasting coal cinders “lest the ‘Black and Tans‘ called” and as she would confirm she “would sort them out”. Anyway, my father agreed, “Three Hail Marys for all the soldiers who died with no-one to pray for them” he said.

We all said the three Hail Marys and I was satisfied. I must have been about 8 years old or so at that time. My special dedication would now be done many times. My father was a special man and very tolerant. After a few years, the feeling of the lost and forgotten souls began to dig deeper and I decided to amass the largest collection of “War Dead” databases, currently available in Ireland, so that I could assist those searching for information on their kinsfolk and acquaintances.

The idea of some brave soldier dying in a foreign field, his people not knowing where he had died, where he had been buried or why he had been buried in that particular place, to me, did nothing to validate well earned respect. It was during the summer of 2005 and 2006 my wife, Ruth and I decided to visit all the Tipperary cemeteries and record the Great War graves contained in them.

If no-one else cares to remembers them at least they will be remembered here in this book –” Tipperary Casualties of the Great War“.

This book is currently available from “Bookworm” email – info@bookworm.ie

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52 comments to Tipperary Casualties of the Great War – Book Of The Month

  • pat power

    Hi Tom
    I am tracing my grand uncle killed in the great war he was from thurles, I was informed he was mentioned in your book Tipperary casualties of the Great War. Book worm don’t have it where else can it be got. Thanks pat. ps I know you did the research for the wall in St Mary’s cemetary.

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Pat.
    I met you in Lidl and was able to establish you had more than one relative in died in the war. I happened to have a book in the car with me. I can see that you have a long road of discovery opened up ahead of you with the information in the book. Start with the 1901 and 1911 census and then continue with the births and deaths index available online here;
    http://pilot.familysearch.org/recordsearch/start.html#p=collectionDetails;t=searchable;c=1408347
    Let us know how you get on.
    Regards.
    Tom.

  • David Hall

    Hi Tom

    Your book has caused great excitement in my family. Patrick Quinlan is said to have left Kilsheelan to fight in the great war and never to be heard of since. Since finding out his service number from your great book, I have found that he is buried in Egypt and from the date of his death I know that he died on the operations after the capture of Jerusalem. I know he joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers probably because they were based in Tipperary Town from 1914 to 1918. I have his medal record. But other than this I know nothing about him. I have the birth certificate of his brother John Quinlan (born 1873) my Grandad and I know his Parents names, John Quinlan and Mary Quinlan (nee Sheridan). I live in England and want to find out more about my Great Uncle. How do you suggest I go about this?

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello David.
    I love hearing stories about the book like yours and I am sure there are a lot more but I hardly ever hear of them. Now then, young lad, start your search here;
    http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/
    you can pin him down with the census, and its free!!. The next bit is a bit more tricky. Ancestry.com is allowing new ‘clients’ 14 days free trial and any records of ww1 men that were not burned by the Luftwaffe bomb on London in ww2 will be in it. These are commonly known as the ‘burnt documents’. Its best to follow the free options before asking a researcher to do it for you.
    Patrick Quinlan was originally in the Royal Irish Regiment where his number was 9016, and transferred to the Inniskillikgs (AKA the ‘Skins’) which are a Northern Ireland based unit. Why he transferred I have no idea. Quinlan is still a common name here in Tipperary.
    Enjoy your trek through the archives, you never know what you will find….
    Please let us know how you get on.
    Kind regards.
    Tom.

  • Myriam Scott

    Tom, I received your wonderful book last year. I am particularly interested in the Hayes family of Holycross and John Quinane. Your reference to John Quinane’s grandfather, John Quinane leaving Gurtnahalla for Aust in 1852 could I ask your source for this information please.
    With thanks
    Myriam Scott (nee Kinane)

  • Tom Burnell

    The Military information on Pte John Quinane came from his records. His link to Gortahalla came from a newspaper snippet in the Tipperary Star as far as I remember.
    Regards.
    Tom.

  • Myriam Scott

    Thank you Tom for your reply. I will have to get hold of the Tipperary Star article. I knew John had connections to Gortnahalla but I thought his grandfather was Michael Quinane who died in 1847

  • Ruth Schroeder

    Dear Mr Burnell,

    I’m writing from the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford in relation to your book “The Wexford war dead” for which we would like to establish name authority headings (for cataloguing). It would be greatly appreciated if you could contact me.

    Many thanks,
    R. Schroeder

  • JPC from Sydney

    Dear Tom,

    I’m writing from Sydney, Australia. I was delighted to find out about your book on the Wicklow War Dead today and was hoping you could please help me out over a family tragedy. There is an old story that my GGG grandfather, Thomas Hennessy (sometimes spelt Hennessey), from Tinahely in Co Wicklow had 3 sons and they were all killed in WWI. It pretty much wiped out the family.

    I think I’ve managed to find one of the sons, William, who was a private in the 11th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (no. 15185). He was killed on the first day of the Somme offensive. But I have turned all the records available on-line upside down and have not been able to find out anything else. Are the Hennessy/Hennesseys included in your book (which I cannot get here yet unfortunately)?

    Many thanks, JPC.

  • Hi JPC,
    I have passed on your Email address to Tom, No doubt he will contact you in due course.
    Regards

  • Tom Burnell

    Here are the all the Henesseys encounted so far…
    HENNESSY, JAMES. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Unit; 2nd Battalion. Date of Death: 23-December-1914. Service No: 8922. Born in Tipperary. Enlisted in Carlow while living in Graigue, Carlow. Killed in Action. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. C. 4. Cemetery: Prowse Point Military Cemetery in Belgium. Also listed under Carlow/Graigue on the Great War Memorial, Milford Street, Leighlinbridge, County Carlow.

    HENNESSY, MURLAGH FRANCIS. Rank: Gunner. Regiment or Service: Royal Marine Artillery. Unit: H. M. S. “Lion. ” Killed in action during the Battle of Jutland. H. M. S. Lion, from ‘Naval Operations’ by Sir Julian Corbett, 1923; –…with main and secondary armament in action the German salvoes were being delivered about every twenty seconds, and our ships too were in a forest of waterspouts. It was one of the hottest moments of the action, when every nerve had to be strained to the utmost, and Admiral Beatty, having the enemy well abaft his beam, signalled to the 13th flotilla that it seemed a good opportunity to attack. Five minutes later, while the fight still raged at its hottest, the Lion received a nearly fatal blow. A heavy shell struck Q-turret, entered the gun-house, burst over the left gun, and killed nearly the whole of the guns crews, and it was only the presence of mind and devotion of the officer of the turret, major F. J. Harvey, R. M. L. I. , when almost incapacitated with a mortal wound, that saved the flagship from sudden destruction.
    Age at death: 27. Date of Death: 31-May-1916 Service No: RMA/12255. Supplementary information: Son of Arthur Hennessy and Margeret Connors his wife, of Turbotstown, Coole, Co. Westmeath. Native of Newtown, Bagenalstown, Co. Carlow. Killed on the first day of the Battle of Jutland. Grave or Memorial Reference: 21. Memorial: Portsmouth Naval Memorial UK.

    HENNESSEY, DENIS. Rank: Pte. Regiment or Service: Royal Munster Fusiliers. Unit; 8th Battalion. Date of Death:20-July-1916. Service No:4800. Born in Tralee, County Kerry. Enlisted in London while living in East Finchley, Middlesex. Killed in action. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. C. 7. Cemetery: Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

    HENNESSEY, JOHN. Rank: Company Sergeant Major. Regiment or Service: Leinster Regiment. Unit; 2nd Battalion. Date of Death:31-July-1917. Service No:4797(SDGW) 4794(CWGC). Born in Listowel, County Kerry. Enlisted in Tralee. Killed in action. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on Panel 44 on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium.

    HENNESSY/HENNESSEY, PATRICK. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit: 2nd Battalion. Age at death; 42. Date of Death: 17-February-1917. Service No: 365. Born in Kilmacow, County Kilkenny. Enlisted in Cork while living in Ballyduff, County Waterford. Died. Supplementary information; Son of James and Margaret Hennessy, of Co. Kilkenny; husband of Bridget Hennessy, of Ballyduff S. O, Co. Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: XXI. G. 12. Cemetery; Etaples Military Cemetery in France.

    HENNESSY, A P. ( Also listed as PATRICK). Rank: Lance Corporal. Regiment or Service: Leinster Regiment. Unit: “C” Coy. 2nd Bn. Age at death, 19. Date of Death: 31/July/19 17. Born in Navan. Enlisted in Dublin. Killed in Action. Service No: 9959. Supplementary information; Son of Mrs. E. Ryan, of Seffin, Birr, King’s Co.
    King’s County Chronicle, August, 1918.
    In Memoriam
    First Anniversary. —In sad and loving memory of Corps. Patrick Hennessy, Leinster Regiment., killed in action, July 31, 1917, second son of Mrs Ryan, Seffin, Birr, aged 19 years, Deeply regretted.
    Grave or Memorial Reference: Has no known grave but is commemorated on Panel 44 on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium.

    HENNESSY, CHRISTOPHER. Rank: Pte. Regiment or Service: Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
    Unit; 7th Battalion. Date of Death:19-November-1915. Service No:19370. Born in Tullamore, King’s County. Enlisted in Dublin while living in Tullamore. Died at Sea. (Note; See the article that accompanies Martin Hensey. Hennessy may be Hensey, Author). He is also listed on the Tullamore Roll of Honour as HENSEY, and states that Martin Hensey and Christopher Hensey are brothers. It also says that Martin died in Salonika.
    Grave or Memorial Reference: III. D. 97. Cemetery: East Mudros Military Cemetery in Greece.

    HENNESSY, HERBERT WILLIAM. Rank: Sergeant. Regiment or Service: Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). Unit; 22nd Battalion. Date of Death:17-February-1917. Service No:1233. Born in Birr, King’s County. Enlisted in London while living in London, E. C. Killed in Action. Age at Death;32. Won the Military Medal and is listed in the London Gazette. Supplementary information; Son of John and Elizabeth Hennessy, of Birr, King’s County.
    Grave or Memorial Reference: Pier and Face 8 C 9 A and 16 A. Memorial: Thiepval Memorial in France.

    HENNESSY, JAMES. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Dublin Fusiliers. Unit; 2nd Bn. Date of Death: 23-12-1914. Service No: 8922. Born in Tipperary. Enlisted in Carlow while living in Graigue, Carlow. Killed in Action. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. C. 4. Cemetery: Prowse Point Military Cemetery in Belgium.

    HENNESSEY, JAMES C, Rank; Private First Class. 61st Infantry Regiment, 5th Division. U. S. Army. Born Cashel on the 15th Sept 1876. Enlisted in Caldwell, New Jersey while living in Humboldt New York. Killed in action 3-11-1918. Buried Plot B Row 14, Grave 6 Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Romagne, France.
    Image 70
    Picture from Nominal Rolls of New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

    HENNESSEY/HENNESSY, MARTIN. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Aukland Infantry Regiment, Embarked with the 31st Reinforcements Aukland Infantry Regiment, A Company on the Vessel ‘Tahiti’ on 16-11-1917. Date of Death: 1-10-1918. Service No: 63871. Age at Death, 35. Martin Hennessy is down as Mr W Hennessy in an article in the Tipperary Star in Oct 1918. A requiem Mass was held in Toomevara one Monday in October 1918 for the repose of his soul. The celebrants were Rev T Dooley, CC, assisted by Rev M O’Connor, CC and the Rev Fr Flynn, PP. Son of Philip and Mary Hennessy of Kilnafinch, Latteragh, Thurles, Ireland. Fathers address is also down as Grennanstown, Toomevara. Killed in Action in Le Chateau in France. Grave or Memorial Reference: V. A. 2. Cemetery: Flesquieres British Cemetery in France.

    HENNESSEY/HENNESSY, THOMAS. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Munster Fusiliers. Unit; 8th Bn. Date of Death: 7-9-1916. Service No: 4881. Born in Thurles. Enlisted in Templemore while living in Thurles. Died of wounds. Grave or Memorial Reference: Plot 2, Row C, Grave 39. Cemetery; Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension in France.

    HENNESSY/HENESSEY, WILLIAM. Rank: Gunner. Regiment or Service: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery. Unit; 12th Battery. Date of Death: 12-3-1915. Service No: 28957. Born in Templemore. Enlisted in Exeter. Killed in Action. Grave or Memorial Reference: III. G. 5. Cemetery: Royal Irish Rifles Graveyard Laventie in France.
    Waterford Men in the Casualty List.
    It is feared that Private M Hartery, Cadet Corps, Royal Irish Regiment, has been killed. His mother received a notification that he had been wounded and was in hospital, the particular hospital not being named. A pal of his wrote home, however, some time ago stating that he had been killed, and yesterday his mother received a letter from Private Hennessy, Waterford, who stated that he was present at his burial.
    The following is a letter which Mrs Hartery, Mayor’s Walk, mother of Private Hartery referred to above, has received from the Reverend W. Fitzmaurice, Chaplain to the Forces; —
    2nd Battalion, the Royal Irish Regiment.
    B. E. F. , France.
    Dear Mrs Hartery—I am sorry to keep you so long without a reply to your letter, for I have so many to answer and must take them in rotation. Yes, it is true that your son was killed. I myself found his body after the fight, and we buried him together with others of his comrades near the spot where he was killed. We put up a cross with his name on it, and the grave will be cared for. The Graves Registration Commission will able to tell you all about the locality of the grave after the war, as it has been reported to them, and they are charged with the care of it. Your son was killed on the morning of July 5th. Whether he was killed instantly, I cannot say, as I was not near him at the time, but some distance behind. From the position in which I found him, and from his nearness to the enemy (he was only a few yards from the wood he was attacking) I should think he was killed almost instantly. Anyhow, he was a good lad and went to his duties, and a few minutes before he was killed he received the General Absolution from me together with the rest of his platoon, so you have nothing to be anxious about on that score. I offer you my sincerest sympathy in your loss. He has been remembered several times already in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, which I have offered up for those who were killed in the battle. —Yours sincerely.
    W. Fitzmaurice, S. J. , C. F.

    HENNESSY, EDWARD. Rank: Winchman. Regiment or Service: Mercantile Marine. Unit: S. S. “Formby” ( Glasgow ). The ship was lost with all hands and never located during a fierce storm. Age at Death: 32. Date of Death: 16-December-1917. Supplementary information; Son of the late James and Mary Hennessy; husband of Mary Hennessy (nee Culleton ) of 3, Bank Lane, Waterford. Born at New Ross, Co. Wexford. Memorial: Tower Hill Memorial UK. He is also listed on the Formby-Coningbeg Memorial, Adelphi Quay in Waterford City.

    HENNESSY/HENNESSEY, JOHN. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Munster Fusiliers. Unit: 2nd Battalion. Age at death; 29. Date of Death: 10-November-1917. Service No: 7099. Born in Waterford. Enlisted in Dundee while living in Dundee. Killed in Action. Supplementary information; Son of Patrick and Mary Hennessy, of 32, Morrison’s Rd, Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: 143 to 144 on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium.

    HENNESSEY/HENNESSY, MICHAEL. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit; 2nd Battalion. Date of Death: 03-December-1915. Age at Death, 23. Service No: 5801. Born in St John’s, Waterford. Enlisted in Waterford. Died at home.
    Supplementary information; Son of Michael and Catherine Hennessy, of 5, Gas House Lane, Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: RC. 828. Cemetery: Netley Military Cemetery, Hampshire, UK.

    HENNESSY, MICHAEL. Rank: Able Seaman. Regiment or Service: Mercantile Marine. Unit: S. S. “Lough Fisher” (Barrow). Shelled and sunk by a German submarine 12 miles S. E of Cork. Age at death; 20. Date of Death: 30-March-1918. Supplementary information; Son of John and Margaret Hennessy (nee McNamara), of 7, Thomas Hill, Waterford. Born at Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on the Tower Hill Memorial in the UK.

    HENNESSEY, MICHAEL. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit; 2nd Battalion. Date of Death: 22-September-1914. Service No: 10502. Born in Trinity Without, Waterford. Enlisted in Waterford. Died of Wounds. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on the La-Ferte-Sous-Jouarre-Memorial in France.

    HENNESSY, PATRICK. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit: 2nd Battalion. Age at death; 42. Date of Death: 17-February-1917. Service No: 365. Born in Kilmacow, County Kilkenny. Enlisted in Cork while living in Ballyduff, County Waterford. Died. Supplementary information; Son of James and Margaret Hennessy, of Co. Kilkenny; husband of Bridget Hennessy, of Ballyduff S. O, Co. Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: XXI. G. 12. Cemetery; Etaples Military Cemetery in France.

    HENNESSY, PATRICK. Rank: Carpenter. Regiment or Service: Mercantile Marine. Unit: S. S. “Coningbeg” (Glasgow). Date of Death: 18-December-1917. Torpedoed by German Submarine U-62. There were no survivors. Supplementary information; Son of the late Thomas and Agnes Hennessy; husband of Mary Hennessy (nee Kough), of 28, St. Alphonsus Rd, Waterford. Born at Waterford. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on the Tower Hill Memorial in the UK. He is also listed on the Formby-Coningbeg Memorial, Adelphi Quay in Waterford City.

    HENNESSY, EDWARD. Rank: Winchman. Regiment or Service: Mercantile Marine. Unit: S. S. “Formby” ( Glasgow ). The ship was lost with all hands and never located during a fierce storm. Supposed to have been torpedoed by German Submarine U-62. Very little wreckage ever from the Formby but the body of a Stewardess ( Annie O’Callaghan ) was washed up on the Welsh shore. Age at Death: 32. Date of Death: 16-December-1917. Supplementary information; Son of the late James and Mary Hennessy; husband of Mary Hennessy ( nee Culleton ) of 3, Bank Lane, Waterford. Born at New Ross, Co. Wexford. Memorial: Tower Hill Memorial UK.

    HENNESSY, JAMES. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Irish Guards.
    Unit; 1st Bn. Date of Death: 08-August-1915. Age at Death, 25. Service No: 5054. Born in Baltinglass, Co Wicklow. Enlisted in Tamworth, Staffs while living in Baltinglass. Died of wounds. Supplementary information: Son of William and Kate Hennessey, of Chapel Hill, Baltinglass, Co. Wicklow. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. A. 14. Cemetery; Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy in France.

    HENNESSY, WILLIAM. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Unit; 11th Bn. Date of Death: 01-July-16, first day of the Battle of the Somme. Age at Death, 22. Service No: 15185. Born in Kilcoman, Co Wicklow. Enlisted in Mullingar while living in Tinahely. Killed in Action. Supplementary information: Son of Thomas Hennessy, of River View, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on Pier and Face 4 D and 5 B on the Theipval Memorial in France.

    Regards.
    Tom.

  • James G. Dunne

    Would be grateful to receive any information on John O Shea , 4309 1st Bn Irish Guards KIA on 15 May 1915. Born in Ballylynch, Carrick On Suir, Tipperary 1893. John was my Granduncle. I believe he is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery France.

    Thanking you in anticipation.

  • Tom Burnell

    O’SHEA/SHEA, JOHN. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Irish Guards. Unit; 1st Bn. Age at Death: 22. Date of Death: 15-May-1915. Service No: 4309. Born in Carrick-on-Suir and enlisted in Clonmel. Died of wounds at No 2 Field Ambulance. Supplementary information; Son of Walter and Mary O’Shea, of Ballylynch, Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary. Grave or Memorial Reference: III. D. 1. Cemetery: Bethune Town Cemetery in France.
    After his death his effects were received by his mother, Mrs W O’Shea, Ballylinch, Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary.

  • Cillin

    Tom,
    Re your book on the Offaly War Dead. I have seen this paragraph in an Offaly Historical and Archaeological Society publication before. What I am interested in is finding out where the historical backup for this came from. The Michael Foley mentioned is my grandfather….and I am trying to track down all historical information I can on him. If you can message me directly and advise I would really appreciate it.
    Less than a month before the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin, T.R. Dixon, British Army Recruiting Officer for Offaly attended a meeting of the Edenderry Town Commissioners, at which Denis Fay presided over as chairman. After hearing Dixon’s request for more troops, the town council decided to form themselves into a committee to stimulate recruiting in that part of the Kings County. Many questions remain unanswered as to why certain individuals decided to enlist and it may not be as simple as to suggest that economic necessity was the reason why many decided to go to war. Why did 27 year old Patrick Behan, of Edenderry a chair maker, secure in a thriving employment enlist to “fight for the rights of small nations?” His friend and neighbour, an unemployed grocer’s assistant, Michael Foley, then aged twenty two, threw his lot in with the Irish volunteers on Easter Monday 1916 in the G.P.O.

  • Tom Burnell

    If your look at the bottom of your quote in the book, you will see it comes from the forward. This was kindly written by Dr Ciarán J. Reilly, Secretary, Edenderry Historical Society. You may contact him in Maynooth College on ciaran.j.reilly@nuim.ie
    Regards.
    Tom.

  • Tom Burnell

    Some excellent newspapers still exist on microfiche covering Offaly during the Great War period. The King’s County Chronicle, The Kings County Independent, and The Midland Tribune (Tipperary Sentinel and King’s County Vindicator). These can be viewed for free in the Local Studies section in the County Library in Birr. They are very helpful people.
    Tom.

  • Gerry Carroll

    Trying to get info on my grandfather Patrick Carroll,honourably discharged when wounded in the Great War.
    Is buried in Ballycahill near Thurles.

  • Gerry Carroll

    Where can I buy your book?
    I’m living in Australia.

  • Ed Rochfort

    Hello Tom!

    I stumbled upon your thread while doing a search on your name. Hope life is treating you well.

    It’s been a very long time since we last met. I emigrated to Canada in 1980 and will be visiting Ireland in early September with my wife. We will be visiting my wife’s family in Nenagh and perhaps we will have a chance to talk about old times.

    Congratulations on the success of your two books and I look forward to meeting you again.

    All the best,

    Ed.

  • Tom Burnell

    Steady Eddie, its great to hear from you again. I did a search for you in the past but did not find you. I thought it would be a doddle, but there you go. Friend me on facebook and we will take it from there. Otherwise, get to Holycross and ask for me. Say hello to the wife for me!!
    Cheers.
    Tom.

  • Gerry Carroll

    I would like to buy a copy of your book on Tipperary soldiers.
    I would be grateful if you could send me purchase details.

    Regards,

    Gerry Carroll

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Gerry.
    They are getting scarce, it was a limited run. Try here;
    http://www.thehistorypress.ie/product.asp?P_ID=431
    Tom.

  • JPC

    Dear Tom and George,

    Last year, you very kindly helped me with an inquiry about the Hennessys from Wicklow who were killed in WWI.

    I was looking at the WWI Soldiers Wills recently put on-line by the National Archives and found one for James Hennessy of the Irish Guards WO E/112747, service number 5054) who left all his property to his mother, Kate, of Chapel Hill, Baltinglass, Co Wicklow. James died at Givenchy on 8 Aug 1915. I am guessing, but he may have been a Wicklow man.

    Here is the link to his will:

    http://soldierswills.nationalarchives.ie/reels/sw/HennessyJ_E112747.pdf

    Kind regards,

    JPC.

  • Tom Burnell

    Here are the Wicklow Hennesseys;
    Cheers.
    Tom.
    HENNESSY, JAMES. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Irish Guards.
    Unit; 1st Bn. Date of Death: 08-August-1915. Age at Death, 25. Service No: 5054. Born in Baltinglass, Co Wicklow. Enlisted in Tamworth, Staffs while living in Baltinglass. Died of wounds. Supplementary information: Son of William and Kate Hennessey, of Chapel Hill, Baltinglass, Co. Wicklow. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. A. 14. Cemetery; Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy in France.

    HENNESSY, WILLIAM. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. Unit; 11th Bn. Date of Death: 01-July-16, first day of the Battle of the Somme. Age at Death, 22. Service No: 15185. Born in Kilcoman, Co Wicklow. Enlisted in Mullingar while living in Tinahely. Killed in Action. Supplementary information: Son of Thomas Hennessy, of River View, Tinahely, Co. Wicklow. Grave or Memorial Reference: He has no known grave but is listed on Pier and Face 4 D and 5 B on the Thiepval Memorial in France.

  • Deirdre Donahue

    Hi Tom,
    I know that at one point you were researching Comans with regard to “Bill the Black”. I am descended from an Edward Coman and Kitty Ryan who lived in Laffina Lane, outside of Clogher. Edward Coman lived 1830-1892, fathering at 13 children, 7 of which emigrated to Chicago, Illinois. Names that appear in the family are Cornelius, Bridget, John, Thomas, Josephine, Lawrence, Judith, Timothy. Was curious if you had run across anything about this family in your research.

    Thanks for all that you do.

    Best,
    Deirdre

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Deirdre.
    Bill was born in Loughfedora in Cashel and moved to Holycross on the death of his mother in 1909. The family split up at that time, some of the girls went in to service, one to an orphanage and most of the lads worked with the father in Rockwell College. Bill’s father, John, had a connection with the Comans in the Mall Thurles where they had a pub but they hit on hard times and went their own ways it seems. The family signing their name Commins Cummins Comans did not help tracing their past. Even when Bill joined the British Army he signed on as “Willie Conan”. He used his real name when he re-joined,leaving his wife and daughter, in 1939 in London with the Royal Engineers, and off to France and then to Stalag 11A (where the officers who tried to blow up Hitler in the Bunker were executed) His real adventures only started after that. It makes his part in the Mutiny at Jullundur look like a tea party, but that but wait for another time.
    The Comans must have stemmed from one South Tipperary source but in all my endeavors I could not crack it. The Comans are all within a few miles of Clogher, Cashel, Littleton, Holycross, Cloughane, and Thurles. If there is a connection, and they are all connected in the distant past I have not found it. I know it must be but I am darned if I can find it. Your first names are common with the Comans, as was Edmund. I have not found a connection with your branch, sorry. Bill is buried not 200 yards from where I write this. His daughter was still alive recently and lives in London with her son…who is the image of Bill.
    Kind regards and a happy and peaceful New Year to you and yours.
    Kind regards.
    Tom.

  • Deirdre Donahue

    Tom,

    Thank you for your kind reply. Yes, those Comans are a hard bunch to crack! Bill’s story is fascinating. There is a family story about one of the Coman kids, born in the US, sent back to Ireland because he was such a handful. Apparently, he killed a policeman (in Thurles, I believe) and snuck back into the U.S., arriving in San Francisco on the day of the great earthquake in 1906. I always thought this story was just legend until I connected with a distant cousin who knew of the same tale.
    Again, thank you for your response.
    All the best,
    Deirdre Donahue

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Deirdre.
    Try as I might I could not locate any mention of a constable being shot dead in Thurles in 1906. However, there was a District Inspector shot dead in Thurles in 1919. Would your dates be off?
    Kind regards.
    Tom.

  • Brendan Martin

    Do you have any information on the Martin Family from Tipperary? I know one of my relatives died in WWI, Maurice Martin. I am not 100% sure if the address below is correct.

    Maurice Martin
    Birth in Goats lane Knockanrawley,Tipperery
    Death 09 Sept 1916 in France – Battle of the Somme

    Enlistment Location: Cahir, Co. Tipperary
    Royal Irish Regiment
    Rank: Company Quartermaster Sergeant Service Number 9391

    He is buried at THIEPVAL MEMORIAL France, Pier and Face 3 A.

    Regards Brendan Martin

  • Tom Burnell

    The only information I have on Martin is:-
    MARTIN, MAURICE. Rank: Company Sergeant (C. Q. M. S). Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit; 6th Bn. Date of Death: 9/09/1916. Service No: 9391. Born in Tipperary. Enlisted in Cahir while living in Tipperary. Killed in Action. He has no known grave but is listed on Pier and Face 3A on the Theipval Memorial in France.

    There were two other Martin casualties;
    MARTIN, JOHN. Rank: Lance Corporal. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Fusiliers. Unit; 2nd Bn. Age at Death: 35. Date of Death: 17/05/1915. Service No: 5754. Born in Clonmel and enlisted in Newry while living in Oldbridge Co Waterford. Died of wounds. Supplementary information; Husband of Annie Martin, of 13, Quin’s Lane, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. Grave or Memorial Reference: I. H. 5A. Cemetery: Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

    MARTIN, JOSEPH. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Irish Guards. Unit; 2nd Bn. Date of Death: 02/07/1916. on the second day of the battle of the Somme. Service No: 8886. Born in Nenagh and enlisted there also. Killed in Action. Supplementary information; Son of John Martin, of Birr Rd, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. Grave or Memorial Reference: II. K. 19. Cemetery: Essex Farm Cemetery in Belgium.

    Cheers.
    Tom.

  • George Willoughby

    Tom, as always you are a wealth of information which is difficult to trace. Many thanks.

  • Tom Burnell

    Go on ye good thing!!

  • Mary Kennedy

    Hello, Tom,

    I came across your book The Tipperary War Dead in a shop in Kilkenny recently (though my WWI connections relate to Laois). I am part of a small history society outside of Nenagh and am hoping to get your permission to publish extracts of the book in respect of the names related to our locality in historical journal to be published locally at year end. I tried to contact the publishers without success. The extracts would, of course, be credited to yourself and Ruth. I can give you further information if that helps.

    Regards,
    Mary Kennedy

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Mary.
    Feel Free to use whatever you wish with my blessing. 1,468 casualties is the present Tipperary total. If you let me know the names or/and locations I can send you any updated material not in the book. The Laois War Dead (560 Casualties) along with other counties is also completed and awaits publication but like yourself I cannot contact the publishers either. On another note,my Aunt was from Nenagh, you probably knew her, she was known as ‘The Widow Nolan’ and Burnell was her single name. Sin scéal éile!.
    Kind regards.
    Tom.

  • George Willoughby

    Thanks Tom, I have forwarded your Email address To Mary and removed your address as requested.

  • Katie.

    George. Try as I might here on the Gold Coast in our book shops asking about Tom Burnell’s book. One shop owner said they would try and get it for me if they can. Any help as to where we can get this book will be very much appreciated.

    Katie.

  • Tom Burnell

    Ebay have 7 listed.
    Regards.
    Tom.

  • Katie.

    Thank you Tom. I will certainly try EBay. If I can get one of your books that will be great for our Expat Association.

    Katie.

  • Tom Burnell

    Thank you George and Katie.
    Regards.
    Tom.

  • Tom Burnell

    I came across this and thought it your readers might enjoy it.
    Cheers.
    Tom.
    Monkey Puzzle at Tipperary.
    Private Pat Fraher, of the Irish Horse, a native of Tipperary, gave an amazing exhibition of strategy on Monday and Tuesday last. Some few weeks ago he deserted from his regiment at Cahir and took up residence in his former domicile in Roesboro road., successfully dodging and diddling the full force of police and military of all Tipperary Town during that time. After making several futile onslaughts at different periods upon the deserter’s dwelling, the police succeeded on Monday evening in ferreting out from cover the elusive Fraher, who, however, cutely scuttled off, to the mystification of the bobbies, in the direction of Emly, where he berthed for another night. Early on Tuesday morning the police after scouring North, South, East and West again found their quarry near Roesboro Ro., and thereupon followed one of the most exciting chases ever heard of in all Clanwilliam. Like greased lightening, Fraher darted off towards Arravale with three of the fleetest constables in Tipperary thundering hot foot upon his heels. Over hill and dale, dike and ditch, cross swamp and field, through thorny hedge and prickly briar, tearing and rearing, dashed on the exciting chase. Constable Mockler bloating terribly was now dangerously close when all of a sudden the ingenious Fraher flew up a tree grinning defiantly in monkey fashion at his breathless pursuers. No sooner had the three policemen made their appearance under the tree but they were subjected to a pelting shower of missiles in the form of pieces of branches, which the man aloft rained down in surprising number. “Come down, ” said the constables carefully standing at a safe distance. “I won’t, ” shouted Fraher. “You’ll have to get an aeroplane to fetch me. ” The police meanwhile had been blowing their whistles and a number of the military, non-commissioned officers and privates, amongst them being Provost-Sergeant Jess, made their appearance. A crowd had gathered, and excitement ran high as the citizen of the tree continued to hurl defiance and sticks at his pursuers below. The police threatened to cut down the tree and brought out a cross cut from an adjoining house for the purpose, but Fraher replied that they would have to cut down the whole row of trees then, and he began moving about like a squirrel from one tree to another. Several hours dragged on and still, Fraher, notwithstanding the entering upon the scene of strong military reinforcements, held the besiegers at bay. While the police were smacking a few mouthfuls of grub at a little distance from the tree, Fraher partially slid down from his eerie and laid hold of the ladder with which the police threatened to bring him down, and took it up with him to his fortification. A new weapon of attack was brought forward in the shape of a fire engine and hose. The crowd of civilians were ordered to leave the field, and then a further parley was held. An officer asked Fraher if he was going to come down and Fraher intimated that he was not unwilling to discuss terms. He would come down voluntarily, he said if he got a guarantee that he would be taken into military custody and kept in the military guardroom. The guarantee was given, and Fraher then handed down the ladder and slid to earth amply surrounded by a strong escort he was marched home to the barracks where he was taken to the guardroom, and thence, later on in the evening, to his regiment at Cahir. So the curtain rings down on this amusing episode, which will go down to local history as the “Siege of the Poplar Tree, ” (Our office poet will verify the adventure next week. )

  • Anita Wellard

    Hello

    First can I congratulate you on the work that you are doing. I am researching my family history The Power Clan. In the 1901 and 1911 I found them living in Kilmurry. Two members of the family died in the great war (William and Michael Power) and I believe are buried or lost at Flanders. I would be grateful if you would share any information you may have discovered in your research.

    Very many thanks

    Anita

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Anita.
    Thank you kindly for your comments.
    Which Kilmurry would that be? Which Army would they have been in? and final question, are you sure they were casualites?
    Cheers.
    Tom.

  • Tom Burnell

    Tipperary Michael Power Private Royal Irish Regiment 1st Battalion 6392 16/03/1915 19 Ballyneale, County Tipperary Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary. Ballinacluna, County Tipperary Killed in action Son of Mrs. Margaret Power, of Ballinacluna, Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary. Panel 33 Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium.

    Tipperary William Power Private Royal Irish Regiment 2nd Battalion 6463 19/10/1914 Ballyneil, County Tipperary Clonmel, County Tipperary Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary Killed in action

  • Tom Burnell

    Panels 11 and 12 Le Touret Memorial in France.

  • Jim Ryan

    His name was either Pat, Pack, or Paque Ryan. He got gassed in the trenches but survived. His vocal cords were impaired but not too badly. After his release from hospital He ended up as jockey as entertainment for British Troops for the rest of war in France. I think he died about 1956. He was either a Ryan Martin or a Ryan Mary from Cappamore, Hollyford or Upperchurch. Is there a chance that you may have known any history of this relation. I was young at the time but I do remember the saddle that he showed me from the time he raced. Any information would be a great benefit.
    Regards Jim.

  • Tom Burnell

    Hello Jim.
    I only have information on casualties. The records 36 Patrick Ryan’s from Tipperary who were in the Great War and who enlisted after 1915 are on Findmypast.com This list does not count in those who enlisted before 1915 or who had pre-war service, nor does it include all the P Ryan’s you will find on Ancestry for WW1. This is the path you must take. Searching for Patrick, Pack, Paque or P Ryan, who may be from an unknown townland in Cappammore, Hollyford or Upperchurch in Tipperary will be a lifetime endeavour for you and I wish you every success.
    Kind regards.
    Tom.

  • Tom Burnell

    One sure way to proceed is to get the name, rank, unit and number from his medals and if his records are available they will be easy to identify with this information. If the saddle was his, it more than likely will also have his number on it.
    Toom

  • Lynda Carroll

    Hello,
    This is a wonderful site and thank you for helping so many people trace a loved one lost many years ago. My question is have you any ideas about Tipperary men lost in the Boar War. My Great Grandfather John Carroll was killed in 1900 or 1901 and never saw his son, my grandfather, William Patrick Carroll grow up. They lived in Clonmel but could have been born outside of Clonmel. If you could direct me to another site that may have names on the fallen perhaps I could finally find his name. Thank you, Lynda

  • Tom Burnell

    If you look in FindMyPast using this link you can search for Pre-war service records for the British Army.
    http://search.findmypast.co.uk/search/world-records/military-armed-forces-and-conflict/british-army-service-records-1760-1915~british-army-service-records-1914-1920
    They have over 20,000 records of Tipperary men 1760-1915.
    Now that should keep you busy for the weekend, don’t stay up too late!!
    The best of luck with your search.
    Cheers.
    Tom

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