Local Weather

Thurles
Cloudy
11°C
real feel: 8°C
wind speed: 4 m/s W
sunrise: 7:34 am
sunset: 7:06 pm
 

Archives

Seventeenth Edition Of Culture Night Set For Friday September 23rd 2022.

Ms Fiona Flavin (Assistant Arts Officer with Tipperary County Council) reports: –

“The seventeenth edition of Culture Night, nationwide will take place on Friday September 23rd 2022.

Culture Night (Irish – Oíche Chultúir) is brought to you via the Arts Council; latter being a national moment, where we celebrate culture, creativity and the arts, while seeking to actively promote our rich and varied culture, demonstrating that it remains very much alive, treasured and nurtured in the lives of Irish people, today and every day.
It is delivered nationwide throughout our cities, towns, villages and rural locations, as well as online and through our media partners.

Over 2 million of our people and visitors, are expected to engaged with Culture Night in 2022.

Doors, in many cases, will open to events at 6:00pm until late, and special and unique events are specifically programmed at participating locations. All activities are made available to the public free of charge.

You can see all of the upcoming events in Co. Tipperary at a glance HERE.

Events taking place in Thurles are as follows:-

‘The Source’ Arts Centre Thurles presents a live interactive sound and light installation created by ‘Timpeall’ (Irish Translation – ‘Around’), a multi-disciplinary art collective specializing in immersive multi-sensory events and experiential installations and exhibitions.
The installation reflects on the industrial past of Thurles evoking images, sounds and memories of the former Thurles Sugar Factory, using audio, footage of the factory site and newly created projections.
The installation is part of the wider Sugar Tapes project – an archive of interviews and images of the factory, which was once the economic core of the town, up until its closure in 1989.

Also on Culture Night at The Source Arts Centre, Thurles, ‘Cruthaigh’ (Irish Translation – ‘Create’), present their podcast ‘Everything from Nothing’, also reflecting on the Sugar Factory’s past – and projecting forward, to see what kind of future might occur in the town. Could the creative industries be a key factor in the town’s economy in the medium term?
Start time is 7:00pm. Phone: 353 504-90204 to ensure a seat.

TUS Campus, Nenagh Road, Thurles, presents “Our lives, our identities Young traveller children, We Act”.
Latter features an Art and Media Exhibition based on a series of workshops on “identity objects” facilitated by Artist Francesca Hutchinson with children from the Traveller Family Learning Programme.
This programme focuses on youth leadership and celebrating Traveller identity.
TRTP and TUS Access Department share a vision to inspire, explore and support learning through art in a positive and inclusive space.
This project is being spearheaded by two Irish Traveller postgraduate students, who are extremely passionate about supporting Traveller children to develop a greater sense of belonging.

Start time for this event is 6:00pm, on Friday September 23rd 2022 and attendees are invited to pre-book on eventbrite, HERE.” Event is free.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Shattered Dreams – Singer Nora Fogarty.

Popular local ballad singer Nora Fogarty performs hereunder the song “Shattered Dreams”.

(Lyrics written by Co. Kilkenny poet Kathleen Blanchfield).

Our readers will sadly remember what is commonly referred to as the ‘9/11 attacks’ (September 11th 2001), where four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks were carried out by the militant Islamic extremist network al-Qaeda, against the United States of America.

On the morning of Tuesday, September 11th, 2001, nineteen terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners, each scheduled to travel from northeastern U.S. to California.

The hijackers crashed the first two planes into the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York City, and the third plane into the Pentagon (headquarters of the American military), latter situated at Arlington, Virginia.

The fourth plane which was intended to hit a federal government building in Washington, D.C., crashed into a field, following a revolt by passengers on board the flight.

Sadly, these acts of terrorism killed some 3,000 people, before instigating a global war on terror.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Tipperary’s “Vicar Of Hell”.

For a relatively small almost landlocked realm; Co. Tipperary has had a long and close historical association with the British Royal Family; going back in this instant, described hereunder, to the late 15th century.

Sir Francis Bryan “Vicar Of Hell”.

Sir Francis Bryan was born on June 1st 1490, in Buckinghamshire, England; the son of Sir Thomas Bryan, latter who made his career at court, where he was an ‘Esquire of the Body’ (or personal attendant and courtier) to Henry VII and Henry VIII, and vice-chamberlain to Queen Catherine of Aragon and his later to be wife, Margaret Bourchier, mother of Sir Francis Bryan.

Sir Francis Bryan was regarded as a distinguished Diplomat, Soldier, Sailor, Cipher, Man of letters, and Poet. However, he also had a lifelong reputation as a witty person who pursued sexual depravity, and was rumoured to be an accomplice in the extramarital affairs of King Henry VIII; latter best known for his six marriages and for separating the Church of England from the then existing papal authority.
Indeed King Henry trusted Sir Francis sufficiently to send him to Rome to discuss the annulment of his marriage to Katherine of Aragon, with then Pope Clement VII. Here one of Bryan’s non-conforming methods of diplomacy included sleeping with a prostitute in Rome, to find out what the pope’s views were with regard to King Henry’s marriage issues. Despite the diplomatic ability of Sir Francis, Pope Clement refused to annul Henry’s marriage.

Sir Francis first came to court at a young age, together with his brother-in-law Nicholas Carew, joining the Privy Chamber during the reign of King Henry VIII. Both were well known for their avoidance of moderation and excessive indulgences, especially in alcohol use. However, they held much influence with King Henry and were rewarded for their friendship with a number of public offices, by the king; e.g. “Master of the Toils” (1518–48), “Constable of Castles” at Hertford, Harlech and Wallingford, (1518–36), “Cipherer of the Household” (1520), “Gentleman of the Privy Chamber” one year later in 1521 and “Esquire of the Body” by 1522 [latter post a personal attendant and courtier to the King of England.]
Sir Francis Bryan also sat in the English Parliament, as a Member for Buckinghamshire, certainly in the parliaments of 1539, 1542 and 1545.

In 1519, Bryan and Sir Edward Neville disgraced themselves during a diplomatic mission to Paris, having been found throwing eggs and stones at poor smallholders and labourers of lower social status. Correspondence sent by him, in or about this period, requests that Arthur Plantagenet, 1st Viscount Lisle, the Captain of Calais, (then in English hands), should find Bryan a ‘soft bed and a young woman’.

On returning from France back to England both men behaved as French men in their eating and drinking habits and also in their newly found fashion attire.
Under the Eltham Ordinance (named after Eltham Palace) of January 1526; [latter was a failed attempted reform of the English court of Henry VIII by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey], they were removed from the Privy Chamber on the grounds that ‘after their appetite’ they ‘governed the King’.

About the same time, in or about 1526, Sir Francis lost an eye in a Jousting Tournament at Greenwich, forcing him to wear an eyepatch for the rest of his life.

In 1528, following the death of Sir William Carey, [latter was married to Mary Boleyn, sister of King Henry’s second wife Anne Boleyn, a known mistress of King Henry VIII], a vacancy occurred once again within the Privy Chamber, and Bryan returned, aided possibly through the influence of his half cousin Anne Boleyn, latter commonly then referred to as “the king’s whore” or the “naughty paike [prostitute]”.

Later, King Henry XIII would accuse Anne Boleyn of adultery, incest, and high treason and would commute Anne’s death sentence from being burnt alive at the stake, to being beheaded, and rather than have a queen beheaded with the common executioners axe, he brought an expert swordsman from Saint-Omer in France, to perform her execution.

It was Thomas Cromwell who first coined Sir Francis Bryan’s nickname, “Vicar Of Hell”, in his letter to the Bishop of Winchester [referring to his total abandonment of his half cousin Anne Boleyn].
Later Thomas Cromwell was also himself beheaded on the orders of King Henry VIII and following Cromwell’s execution, Sir Francis Bryan became vice-admiral of the fleet, and later, during the reign of Edward VI, Lord Justice of Ireland.

In his private life in March of 1522, Sir Francis Bryan had married Philippa Spice, (1492 – 1548), only daughter of Humphrey Spice of Black Notley, Essex, latter the former wealthy widow of Sir John Fortescue of Ponsbourne, in March 1522.
After her death the same year, on August 1st 1548, Sir Francis Bryan married Lady Joan Fitzgerald, the widow of James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond, ( James the Lame, – leg wound received at the siege of Thérouanne in 1513); former already the mother of seven sons.

After 1534 James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond had been created Viscount Thurles. Twelve years later on October 17th 1546, he was in London with many of his household. They were invited to dine at Ely Palace in Holborn, where he was poisoned along with his steward, James Whyte, and 16 of his household. He died nine days later, on October 28th, leaving Lady Joan Fitzgerald a widow in her thirties. His poisoning was believed to have been brought about as a result of a previous heated argument with the quarrelsome and unpopular, Lord Deputy of Ireland, Sir Anthony St Leger, latter also a favourite of King Henry VIII.

The marriage by Sir Francis Bryan to Lady Joan is believed to have been a political manoeuvre to prevent Lady Joan from marrying her cousin, the 15th Earl of Desmond. However, their union was believed to have been not the happiest of relationships.
After Bryan’s death in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, on February 2nd 1550, aged 60; Lady Joan Fitzgerald-Bryan did eventually marry Gerald FitzGerald, 15th Earl of Desmond in 1551, with latter groom being many years her junior.

Despite Bryan’s expressed desire to be buried in Co. Waterford, his body was interred in Old St. Mary’s Churchyard, Clonmel, County Tipperary, latter the jewel in the crown of today’s Clonmel historic sites.
Alas, today the oldest headstone that is readable in the graveyard, dates only back to 1625 and no known portrait of Sir Francis Bryan, or his poetic verse is known to exist.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

I Won’t Crumble With You If You Fall.

I Won’t Crumble With You If You Fall.

Singer: Tom Jones. Songwriters: Bernice Reagon.

The wonderful voice of Tom Jones is like a fine wine. It just gets better & better with age.

I will wake in the morning if you call,
And I’ll stand beside you as long as I can.
I will hold back the evening of your sun,
But I won’t crumble with you if you fall.

I will shadow the heat of your days,
And I’ll drink from the sweat of your brow.
I will walk to the tune of your song,
But I won’t crumble with you if you fall.

Come and walk with me and hold to my hand.
Touch me, let me know I am here by myself.
Stretch my night dreams into my days.
Stop short of falling apart if I go down.

I’ll wake in the morning if you call.
And I’ll stand beside you as long as I can.
I will hold back the evening of your sun,
But I won’t crumble with you if you fall.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

“The Good Old Way” Or “Down To The River To Pray”

This song hereunder, beautifully sung by Alison Krauss, was often sung by victims of slavery and contained coded messages with regards their attempts to escape.

When the enslaved people escaped, they would walk in the “river” because the water covered their scent from bounty-hunters’ dogs and slave catchers.

Similarly, the words “starry crown” possibly refers to those attempting to escape, to remember to navigate by using the stars.

The words “Good Lord, show me the way” is most likely a prayer for God’s guidance in their efforts to find an escape route, commonly known as the “Underground Railroad.”

The “Underground Railroad” referred too above, was an established network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the 19th century and used by enslaved African Americans to enable their escape into northern free states or Canada.
Regarded as the Father of the “Underground Railroad “; William Still helped hundreds of slaves to escape often hiding them in his home in Philadelphia.
Others unaware of this network of escape routes, would escape independently of the “Underground Railroad”, to take up residence in the swamplands of Virginia and North Carolina, having escaped their cruel enslavement.

A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp.
By Author Harriet Beecher Stowe.

“Away to the Dismal Swamp he speeds,
His path was rugged and sore,
Through tangled juniper, beds of reeds,
Through many a fen, where the serpent feeds, and man never trod before.
And, when on the earth he sunk to sleep,
If slumber his eyelids knew,
He lay where the deadly vine doth weep
Its venomous tears, that nightly steep
The flesh with blistering dew.”

The International Labour Organization estimates that, by their definitions, over 40 million people are in some form of slavery tonight.

“The Good Old Way” or “Down To The River To Pray”.

As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the starry crown
Good Lord, show me the way,
O sisters, let’s go down,
Let’s go down, come on down,
O sisters, let’s go down,
Down in the river to pray.
As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the robe and crown,
Good Lord, show me the way.
O brothers, let’s go down,
Let’s go down, come on down,
Come on, brothers, let’s go down,
Down in the river to pray.
As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the starry crown,
Good Lord, show me the way.
O fathers, let’s go down,
Let’s go down, come on down,
O fathers, let’s go down,
Down in the river to pray.
As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the robe and crown,
Good Lord, show me the way.
O mothers, let’s go down,
Come on down, don’t you wanna go down?
Come on, mothers, let’s go down,
Down in the river to pray.
As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the starry crown,
Good Lord, show me the way.
O sinners, let’s go down
Let’s go down, come on down
O sinners, let’s go down,
Down in the river to pray.
As I went down in the river to pray,
Studying about that good ol’ way,
And who shall wear the robe and crown,
Good Lord, show me the way.

END

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail