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View Winter Solstice At Newgrange Passage Tomb Online

Newgrange Passage Tomb (c1900) Courtesy ‘Tempest Collection’ National Library of Ireland.

Some 5,000 years ago Irish people were involved in the building of gigantic structures with complex astronomical alignments. One such building is the Stone Age (Neolithic) passage tomb at Newgrange, located in the Boyne Valley, County Meath, between Slane and Drogheda. One of a network of such monuments, same can be found in an area of County Meath known as ‘Brú na Bóinne’, [Translated – “The bend in the Boyne”.].

Built around 3,200 B.C. Newgrange is at least 1,000 years older than Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England and the limestone granite Great Pyramids of Giza, latter bordering Cairo, in Egypt.

The passage tomb at Newgrange consists of a mound, roughly circular in shape and measuring 85 metres in diameter. It is surrounded by kerbstones, some of which bear carved decorations, with the most highly decorated being the entrance stone itself.

The most remarkable feature of Newgrange is undoubtedly the roof box [See start of video hereunder] which demonstrates that the people of prehistoric Ireland, responsible for its construction, had a deep understanding of the movements of the stars and the alignment of our planets. Same allows for the dawn light to enter the passage tomb, lighting up the entire passage and chamber on the morning of the Winter Solstice (December 21st).

The Office of Public Works’ annual Winter Solstice gathering at the Neolithic Passage Tomb of Newgrange tomorrow (December 21st 2020) has been cancelled this year, due to the ongoing COVID-19 virus pandemic.

However, this significant Solstice Sunrise event will be live-streamed from within the Chamber on 20th, 21st and 22nd of December, so that those who wish will be able to experience this wonderful phenomenon from any location around the world.

The live stream will be available from 8.45 Coordinated Universal Time, today Sunday December 20th, 2020, and can be viewed from HERE.

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