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New Approach Signs For Thurles.

“If you do not take an interest in the affairs of your government, then you are doomed to live under the rule of fools.”

[From a quote attributed to the Greek philosopher Plato.

Picture (1) Erin Foods closed in June 2008. Picture (2) Thurles.ie no longer exists on line. Picture (3) Disk Parking hasn’t existed for years. Picture (4) North Tipperary Co. Council ceased to exist in 2014.

It’s a local election year. We know this because new signage shown hereunder has now been unveiled to local sitting Councillors, who met yesterday to formally give their ‘sign of approval’ to the project.

New Signage For Thurles

Here on thurles.info we had raised the issue of this new required signage back in July 2018; and again, in March 21st, 2019.

On highlighting this issue, the public realised the 11 years of sheer neglect by our Templemore / Thurles Municipal District councillors, and a brief consultation process was recently began for the redesign of new insignia for Thurles.

This announcement, some 11 year too late, was announced on Tipp FM radio yesterday, mainly driven by the need to highlight individuals and party members, all wishing to ingratiate themselves to voters, prior to the upcoming Local Elections on Friday May 24th next.

This proposed re-branding was revealed by Ms Caroline Nesbitt of “Designedly”, at a recent Municipal District Council meeting. The simple design shows leaves attached to a branch, latter a continuation of the letter T and includes pictures and text noting the different facets of life in our town, e.g. sport, theatre, education and business.

We note the picture specifically highlighting ‘Culture’, namely ‘The Source’ building, was wisely taken at night, thus hiding its ongoing ground floor shabbiness and heavily featured graffiti, not to mention the unkempt overgrown river forefront. Nice job; good exposure.

Disappointingly, we note that while Thurles is more often referred to, (with some pride I hasten to add), as the “Cathedral Town”, no Cathedral building appears to feature in anything we have viewed. [Then again is not our small nation ruled over by decidedly unchristian officialdom?]

As well as a tree branch and photographs, this new signage also includes the phrase “Fan Tamall linn” meaning “Dwell Awhile”, no mention of the failed, TipperaryThe PlaceThe Time.

www.thurles.ie

One small fact however, the website shown on this new signage, namely www.thurles.ie, has so far not been activated for well over 6 years, due to the failure to pay for the cost of the ‘Host Name’, (About €12.00 per annum) Now, because of this failure, it was sold; before being purchased as a Swedish Casino site, by Mardukas Technologies Limited; latter who then cybersquatted on the host name, informing all Thurles visitors and local viewers that they could “Vi guidar dig till de bästa casinobonusarna” which when translated means, “We will guide you to the best casino bonuses.”

Tipperary Co. Council have now regained control of the host name, since the 8th August 2017; for 10 years before renewal again; but almost two years on in 2019, nothing has been done to put the site back on line. (So much for Tipperary Tourism). This proves yet again the amounts of money being wasted by Tipperary Co. Council Officials, supported by our locally elected and paid Councillors.

The Real Reason for Hikes In Tipperary Property Tax

We are not aware of exactly how much tax payer’s money was wasted in any buy-back arrangement with Mardukas Technologies Limited, for the site ‘thurles.ie’. We are aware however that the site, together with the build and administration costs, over the years prior to the purchase by Mardukas, exceeded well in excess of €10,000.

Two Questions; (1) Was the site content deleted when the new purchasers took possession? (2) Was the site ever backed up by Tipp Co.Co.? If No is the answer to both questions, expect another hike in your property tax this year.

Hopefully, those resident in Thurles will also get the opportunity to formally give their ‘sign of approval’ to this new signage, in the interest of public consultation you understand; guaranteed by Tipperary Co. Council and our local elected representatives. After all councillors have confirmed that same was paid for by that recent increase in our property tax.

One wonders did they spend it all on our signage.

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Tipp. Co. Council Seeks To Improve Thurles Streetscape.

Tipperary County Council is seeking to improve the streetscape and public realms of the towns of Thurles through supporting owners of properties to improve and enhance their properties and the public area generally. (This funding obviously comes from savings made by the Templemore / Thurles Municipal District councils failure to erect that couple of meters of bunting during the recent St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in the town.)

Suggested Possible Improvements:

Removal of inappropriate contemporary signage, fittings and general clutter and replacement with shop fascia signage (with an emphasis on hand painted signage).

Painting and general improvements to Commercial and Residential building frontages.

Erection of planters, floral hanging baskets or other environmental improvements.



Picture (1) Erin Foods closed in June 2008. Picture (2) Thurles.ie no longer exists. Picture (3) Disk Parking hasn’t existed for years. Picture (4) North Tipperary Co. Council ceased to exist in 2014.

Speaking of the removal of inappropriate contemporary signage; one wonders will this now see the removal of the long forgotten and neglected array of signage, left decorating the entry routes into the town of Thurles. (Then of course these signs may be left there in an effort to remind our politicians and local councillors of their continued failures over the past 20 years. And people wonder why ‘An Post’ is moving and a beautiful Liberty Square and Friar Street are being totally eradicated by Tipperary Co. Council!)

Grant Aid

Maximum Grant for such improvements is 50% of the approved cost of the works subject to a maximum of €500.00. Priority will be given to applications for properties that are in need of works in order to prevent them from becoming or remaining derelict. (As you can see with regards to dereliction, €250 goes a long way in Thurles if you are strapped for cash.)

Application forms can be found HERE and are also available from the offices of Templemore / Thurles Municipal District council, latter situated at Castle Avenue, in Thurles (Old Library) and any further queries can be directed to Ms Louise Phillips, Tipperary Co. Council, by email at louise.phillips@tipperarycoco.ie or by Telephoning 0761 06 6067.

Completed Application Forms

Completed Application Forms should be clearly marked“Thurles/Templemore Town Enhancement & Painting Scheme 2019” and returned to Ms Janice Gardiner, (Acting District Administrator, Templemore Thurles Municipal District, Castle Avenue, Thurles, Co. Tipperary), by no later than 4.30pm on Friday April 12th. 2019 next.

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Artist Richard Thomas Moynan – A Forgotten Thurles Connection

Well-known Irish painter, Richard Thomas Moynan (27th April 1856-10th April 1906) was born in Dublin at No.1 Eldon Terrace, off the South Circular Road.  He was the fourth of eight children; three sons and five daughters, born to Mr Richard Moynan (Sr.) and his wife Harriet (nee Nobel and daughter of Arthur Nobel, a Church of Ireland clergyman).  The father of Richard Moynan (Jr.) held a managerial position with the fabric importers Ferrier, Pollock and Company, who had registered offices at No. 59 William Street, Dublin 2.

Richard Moynan (Jr.) initially studied medicine; however, his artistic instincts would prove to be too strong to be resisted and shortly before his final medical examinations, he decided instead to commence his training in the arts, at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art, in January 1880.

Somewhat older than his fellow students and perhaps better educated; Richard Moynan was soon winning prizes in the Taylor and Cowper competitions. [The Taylor Art Trust was formed in 1878 in response to the will of Captain George Archibald Taylor, latter who died in 1854 leaving £2,000 for the “the promotion of art and industry in Ireland”.]

In 1882 he moved on to the Royal Hibernian Academy, winning both silver and bronze medals for his talents and in the following year, 1883, achieved the Albert Scholarship for the best picture shown at the Royal Hibernian Academy by any student.  This painting entitled “The Last of the 24th at Isandula” (RHA, 1883), portrayed an imaginary episode in the Zulu wars fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.

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Tipperary Fifth On List Of FSAI’s Offending Food Outlets

The Health Service Executive (HSE), on behalf of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), inspect tens of thousands of food establishments throughout Ireland every year.

Note: Food safety legislation here in Ireland sets standards which food businesses must stringently adhere to, and no short-cuts are acceptable or permitted, when it comes to ensuring the protection of consumer health.

The number of food outlets (takeaways, restaurants, wholesalers, butchers and retailers etc) shut down in Ireland last year, rose by over 25%; when compared to the previous year 2017, with 66 enforcement orders activated across Ireland.
The FSAI have described this increase as totally unacceptable, stating there are “absolutely no excuses for negligent food practices”.

Last year Dublin saw the largest number of such offenders; numbering in total 22; [(Northside (12),  Southside (10)]; however, when broken down by population, it was Co. Louth which fared the worst with 6 closure orders instigated across the county, wrestling the title relating to hygiene-related activities held previously from Co. Donegal.

Counties that were given a clean bill of health in 2018, included Kerry, Wicklow, Offaly, Waterford, Sligo, Kildare, Leitrim and Longford.

While food providing establishments in Thurles town, here in the Premier County also received a clean bill of health; County Tipperary, as a whole entity, comes in at 5th place on a list of 15 named offending counties; which include Kilkenny, Laois, Carlow, Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Clare, Galway, Louth, Meath, Mayo, Westmeath, Cavan and Donegal.Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Archbishop Thomas William Croke – First G.A.A. Patron

Sunday last, July 22nd 2018 marked the 116 anniversary of the death of Archbishop Thomas William Croke (D.Div.) [28 May 1824 – 22 July 1902], the second Catholic Bishop of Auckland, New Zealand (1870–74) and later to become the Irish Archbishop of Cashel and Emly. A former patron of the Gaelic Athletic Association, with the largest GAA stadium situated in Dublin, Croke Park, named in his honour.

Dr Thomas William Croke (D.Div.) Archbishop of Cashel and Emly – Strong Supporter Of Irish Nationalism.

Archbishop Croke was born in Castlecor, Dromin in the parish of Kilbrin, Co. Cork, in 1824. His grandfather was a shopkeeper in the local square. His father, William was Land Agent/Manager for the 4,000 acres Freeman Estate, purchased from the Chinnerys in the early 18th century. (Freemans of Castle Cor, Co. Cork, their home now demolished.).

William his father married a Protestant girl, one Miss Isabella Plummer, daughter of an aristocratic family, latter descendants of the Knight of Glin, a hereditary title held by the FitzGerald families of Co. Limerick, since the early 14th century. Isabella’s parents would disown her following her Roman Catholic marriage to William in 1817.

Archbishop Croke was the third of eight children born of this couple, before his father died in 1834.  William’s brother, Reverend Thomas Croke, now took it upon himself to supervise the education and upbringing of the children.

Two of Archbishop Croke’s brothers would enter the priesthood, while two sisters would enter a convent and become nuns.  Archbishop Croke himself would go on to be educated in Charleville, Co. Cork and later at the Irish College in Paris and the Irish College in Rome, winning academic distinctions, including a Doctorate of Divinity, with honours.

Ordained a priest of the Cloyne diocese at the height of the ‘Great Famine’ (1845-1849) in May of 1847, he was appointed a Professor in Carlow College.  Irish nationalist Member of Parliament (MP) and leader of the Young Ireland movement, William Smith O’Brien claimed that Archbishop Croke fought on the barricades in Paris during the French Revolution in 1848.

In 1858 he became the first president of St. Colman’s College, Fermoy, Co. Cork and then served as both parish priest of Doneraile and Vicar General of Cloyne diocese from 1866 to 1870. Thomas Croke attended the First Vatican Council as theologian to the Bishop of Cloyne in 1870.

In 1870 Croke was appointed Bishop of Auckland in New Zealand, arriving in Auckland on 17th December 1870 on the Steamer “City of Melbourne”. During the next three years as Bishop of Auckland; Croke devoted some of his considerable personal wealth to rebuilding diocesan finances. However, in Auckland there was then little sign of the strongly Irish nationalist line Croke would later adopt following his return here to Ireland; transferred to become a member of the Irish hierarchy as Archbishop of Cashel, (One of the four Catholic Irish archbishoprics, i.e. Cashel & Emly; Dublin; Armagh and Tuam).

Archbishop Croke (His motto – “Mergimur Nunquam”. Literal translation from Latin “We are never sunk”.), would now become a strong supporter of Irish nationalism, aligning himself with the Irish National Land League; an Irish political organisation of the late 19th century which sought to help poor tenant farmers; and with the chairman of the Irish Parliamentary Party, Charles Stewart Parnell, latter a wealthy and powerful Anglo-Irish Protestant landowner. Croke’s support of nationalism caused successive British governments and the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland’s civil service in Dublin to be deeply suspicious of his known associations. He also associated himself with the Temperance Movement of Irish Catholic priest and teetotal reformer, Father Theobald Mathew, [latter born at Thomastown, near Golden, Co. Tipperary, on October 10th, 1790], and the Gaelic League from its foundation in 1893; its aim to restore the Irish language.

Later, somewhat embarrassed by Charles Stewart Parnell’s immorality, Archbishop Croke was forced to distance himself and withdrew from active participation in nationalist politics, following the scandal that erupted over Parnell’s relationship with Mrs Katherine (Kitty) O’Shea, (particularly during the period 1886-1890), latter the separated wife of Parnell’s fellow M.P., Captain William (Willie ) O’Shea.  Captain O’Shea would eventually file for divorce from his wife, citing Charles Stewart Parnell as co-respondent.  A two-day trial would reveal that Mr Parnell had been the long-term lover of Mrs O’Shea and had indeed fathered three of her children. This scandal back then would force the two dominant forces of Nationalism and Catholicism to split wide apart.

Due to his support and known association with Parnell’s efforts, Archbishop Croke now found himself summoned to Rome by Pope Leo XIII and Cardinal Simeoni.  Following his meeting and prior to his return to Ireland, he stayed over at the Irish College in Rome and when questioned regarding the outcome of his meeting with both men, Archbishop Croke stated that he returned to Ireland “Unchanged and unchangeable.”

Archbishop Croke died at the Archbishop’s Palace in Thurles, Co. Tipperary on 22nd July 1902, aged 78 years and he is buried in the Cathedral of the Assumption, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

Today: From the western side and overlooking Liberty Square, in the centre of Thurles, Co. Tipperary, a very fine life sized statue of Archbishop Thomas William Croke (D.Div.) exists bearing the Irish inscription:-

Translation: The Athletic Association of Ireland erected this commemorative plaque as a tribute of honour to the Most Reverend Thomas Croke, D.D., Archbishop of Cashel and Emly, the first Patron of the Gaelic Athletic Association.
An example to everyone of the nobility and strength of the Irish People.

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