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Thurles – Double Ditch

The world outside your private home is not your personal dump.

Last week I had the privilege, for two days, to show a number of American & Canadian persons around the town of Thurles, all intent on combining together to write a Great Famine TV script. Not having recently visited the “Double Ditch”, on the Mill Road, once a Great Famine project initiated for those starving here in Thurles; imagine my embarrassment on discovering the state of this National Monument.

A National Monument in the Republic of Ireland is a structure or site, the preservation of which has been deemed to be of national importance and therefore worthy of state protection.

Proud people just don’t litter.

This 174 year-old-old famine project has had its Mill Road entrance firstly destroyed by the very contractors employed by Tipperary Co. Council to erect fencing and a short concrete footpath, but now someone has erected posts and barbed wire on this public-right-of-way and once pedestrian Mass Path. It has also been turned into a graveyard for unwanted supermarket trollies. Observe it yourself as I viewed it last week.

“Double Ditch” at Mill Road, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

A ditch is a narrow channel dug at the side of a road or in a field. Its purpose to either hold or carry away flood water.
In Anglo-Saxon, the word ‘dïc’ was pronounced ‘deek’ or ‘deetch’. In digging such a water trench the upcast soil will form into a bank alongside it. This banked soil thus means that the word ‘dïc’ included not just the excavation itself, but also the bank of soil derived from such effort. Later word would later evolve into the words we more commonly use today, e.g. ‘dyke’ and ‘ditch’.

The idea of this Thurles “Double Ditch” was firstly to provide work for those unemployed and starving, but was it also possibly erected to provide a dry shortcut for Dr. J.Knaggs himself, when he was wont to cross from his home, (today’s Ulster Bank premises, in Liberty Square, then known as Main Street); travelling via College Lane, The Pike, (today Kickham Street), to visit family relatives in Knaggs Mill, Brewery and Bakery at Archerstown watermill, same later to become Brady’s Mill?

The Double Ditch featured in our video was built in 1846 and remains a well-worn public right-of-way and also later became a Mass Path to the ‘Lady’s Well’ area. During the 19th and early 20th century same naturally became a short cut for all pupils attending schools in Thurles coming from outlying areas and villages e.g. Littleton.

With next year commemorating the 175th year of the Great Famine, [Same officially began on September 13th, 1845 – 1849], today this video must surely bring a blush of shame, not just to the faces of those we have elected locally to represent us, but also to Tipperary Co. Council officials, who have failed to provide a Recycling Depot in Thurles.
Same depots are readily available in the towns of Cashel, Nenagh, Clonmel, Donohill and Roscrea, but Thurles local councillors have once again failed us in every way, except on their social media pages.
For the few who hold a driving licence to tow a trailer, a rough costing for those who wish to clean up such litter can be found HERE.

Meanwhile, those of our starving ancestors, must surely be turning in their graves due to the disrespect shown in their efforts to feed their children / families.

The gift to the town of fruit bearing crab-apple trees, once secretly sowed by these people bounding on this double ditch, are now set on fire; the existing young shutes of Japanese knotweed, which featured in many a “Spring rhubarb tart” during two world wars, are now forced to emerge through filth and grime. [Yes, we should be controlling Japanese knotweed by eating it, instead of Tipperary Co. Council inviting specialist companies to destroy is using poisonous chemicals and at considerable cost to rate payers.]

The “Double Ditch” featured in the above video gets mentioned for the first time in the “Minutes of the Thurles Famine Food Committee”, on Monday, April 20th, 1846.

Those attending that 1846 meeting included Venerable Archdeacon Rev. Henry Cotton [Chairperson [(C. of I.)]. Present also were Dr. O’Connor, Very Rev. Fr. Barron, [(R.C.) St. Patrick’s College, Thurles], Rev. Mr Baker, Rev. Mr Lanigan, Mr O’Brien [Treasurer], Dr. Joshua Knaggs [Medical Doctor] and Mr James B. Kennedy [Secretary].

From these same minutes we learn that the Famine Relief Committee have already begun creating work for those unemployed, ensuring that money in the form of wages, will enable those starving to purchase food. Dr. Knaggs reports his having inspected the works to be undertaken at College Lane and the proposed “Double Ditch”; calculating the expense for the works at College Lane at £20, latter sum today the equivalent of £20,000.

It was agreed that barrows should be purchased from Mr Patrick McGrath [½doz @ 9 shillings]; Mr Daniel Carroll [½doz @ 9/6] and also Mr Dan Dwyer; latter if he wishes to make them. It was further agreed that, when necessary, the Committee have the power to hire asses’ carts at 15 pence per day.

The previous day, April 19th 1846, Mr J. B. Kennedy Esq had informed relief commissioners of the state of Thurles: –
243 families containing 739 men, women and children unable to work and almost totally destitute; and 525 families containing 2625 individuals totally depending on the heads and sons to the number of 790 who cannot procure employment; thus, making in the town, 3364 persons to be relieved”. With regards to the immediate environs [referred to as ‘country parts’] of the town he states: – “The country parts of our District are divided into wards and similar enquiries are in progress, the result of which I have reason to believe will be painful in the extreme”.

On the same day we learn from further written communication sent to the Trustees appointed for the distribution of Indian Meal, quote: – “In the town of Thurles alone there are at this moment 768 families containing 3364 inhabitants in actual want; of these 739 are old men, women and children, unable to work and who have no one to labour for them; and the remaining 2625 are depending on the daily hire of the sons and heads of the families to the number of 790 able to work and now out of employment”.

The following rules for labourers employed to work on this ‘Double Ditch were adopted: –
(1) Hours of labour to be from 7.00am to 7.00pm with 2 hours for meals.
(2) Any labourer found to shirk from reasonable and fair work or refusing to follow the directions of his overseer shall forthwith be discharged and not admitted to the works again.
(3) That the persons employed shall be paid every evening.
(4) That in case a greater number of labourers shall offer themselves than the funds will enable the committee to pay, a preference shall be given to those who have the largest and most necessitous families”.

Work was ordered to commence on the following Tuesday and quote; “Iron is to be purchased to make 20 crow bars, and 6 picks are also to be purchased”.

It was further agreed that, quote: – “Henceforth there be two rates of payment; 8 pence and 5 pence, and that no boy under 12 years old be employed. That tickets of the form now agreed on, should be printed to admit labourers to work – those for men in black ink and those for boys in red ink; Ordered that 500 red and 500 black tickets be printed. Families containing 7 members and over and having 2 men over 17 shall at the discretion of Committee be entitled to 2 black tickets; Families having a less number shall, if the Committee wish, get 2 tickets, one red and one black”.

Yes, expect tourists and visiting footfall to flood Liberty Square soon, but in what century I do not know.

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Thurles Tidy Towns Competition Results 2019

Liberty Pharmacy, No 34 Liberty Square, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

Congratulations to those who took the time, in 2019, to tidy up our town each day, be they the voluntary members of Thurles Tidy towns (Refresh Thurles); Residence Associations; Council Workers; Thurles Men’s Sheds, Scouts, Schools or just that ‘Solitary Resident’; latter who demonstrated singular civic pride in their home; their garden or their business premises.

The only business premises highlighted favourably in the Thurles 2019 report was Liberty Pharmacy, not surprisingly, (Kate Kennedy Prop., see picture on left, her premises also the recent winner of an AIB Retail Excellence Award). For those complaining about lack of footfall to businesses on Liberty Square; here must surely be the perfect example on how to achieve same.

The ruin that once boasted being the Munster Hotel, (thank God judges did not view it from the rear); a so-called ‘Mural’, (Quote from report; “with all due respect there are parts of the mural that look as if they were done by a graffiti artist”), and a house on Mitchell Street, all met, correctly, with unfavourable comments, as did some of our would-be politicians and local councillors, latter who failed to refrain from sticking up photoshopped posters, during local elections.

To the many individuals, local councillors, elected politicians and the numerous organisations who failed to become involved to assist in revitalising our town; please do feel free to blush, to experience total embarrassment, accompanied by no little shame.

Do begin to realise, please, that the world’s 7.6 billion living humans actually only represent 0.01% of all living things. Yet, since the dawn of civilisation, humanity has brought about the loss of over 83% of all wild mammals and half of our now devoid plant life. Farmed poultry now makes up 70% of the existing bird life on our planet, with only 30% of once wild bird life left to run free. Some 60% of all mammals on our earth are livestock, mostly cattle, sheep and pigs; 36% are humans and a mere 4%, and reducing, are animals living in the wild.

Time now to ditch our shame and resolve, in this coming year, to genuinely repent and attempt to repair the severe damage caused by our deliberate neglect and greed, especially in “our neck of the woods” Tipperary; while we still have a place to pass on to future generations.

The most recent Thurles Tidy Towns report (2019) makes for sad, depressive reading. It is imperative that our followers / readers do click HERE and read the 2019 report and more importantly, read between the lines.

Having read this 2019 adjudicator’s report, latter which attempts to bear all the attributes associated with the understanding; gentleness; helpfulness and neighbourliness of adjudicators; rather than their being outright and critical of our obvious neglect, greed and inability as a community; let us now look at the marking sheets for Thurles Tidy Towns over the past five years, inclusive, beginning in 2015 and displayed hereunder.

CentreThurles: CountyTipperary (North): CategoryE: Ref 627

While each of the reports hereunder, demonstrates judging criteria; e.g. Planning and Involvement; Streetscape & Public Places; Green Spaces and Landscaping; Localised Nature and Biodiversity; Sustainability; Tidiness and Litter Control; Streets & Housing Areas; Approach Roads, and finally, Streets & Lanes; we are going to examine the marks allocated under ‘Tidiness and Litter Control’ and ‘Sustainability’. Yes, in each case just one mark has been allocated each year, in the sad hope that our community will feel enthusiastic and empowered to reach greater heights in the years ahead.

Thurles Tidy Towns Results in 2015.

Overall Marks 280; Tidiness and Litter Control – Marks 52; Sustainability – Marks 14.

Thurles Tidy Towns Results in 2016.

Overall Marks 285; Tidiness and Litter Control – Marks 53; Sustainability – Marks 15.

Thurles Tidy Towns Results in 2017.

Overall Marks 293; Tidiness and Litter Control – Marks 54; Sustainability – Marks 16.

Thurles Tidy Towns Results in 2018.

Overall Marks 298. Tidiness and Litter Control – Marks 55; Sustainability – Marks 17.

Thurles Tidy Towns Results in 2019.

Overall Marks 306. Tidiness and Litter Control Marks 56. Sustainability – Marks 18.

While Thurles received 306 marks this year (2019); two other towns in North Tipperary, each in the same category (E), have now jumped well ahead on the judges marking sheet, with Roscrea achieving 322 marks, followed by Nenagh achieving 321 marks.

Nevertheless, other villages and towns in Tipperary, not surprisingly, did achieved high accolades, with Birdhill Tidy Towns (North Tipperary) joint winners of the Tree Project Award; with Ballyboy (North Tipperary) and Gortnahoe (South Tipperary) picking up Endeavour Awards.

In the ‘Waters and Communities‘ category, it was Lattin (South Tipperary) who took the honours, while Terryglass (North Tipperary) took the national honours in Category A.

Gold Award winners in Tipperary were Terryglass, Emly, Kilsheelan and Clonmel; with Silver Award winners being Birdhill and Silvermines. The towns of Cahir, Roscrea and Nenagh all won Bronze Awards.

Surely, these results relate something, as regards our failures in developing community effort here in Thurles.

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Holycross, Thurles – Solemn Novena 2019

“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest”St. Matthew Chapter 11: Verse 28.

The annual Solemn Novena in honour of Our Lady of Perpetual Help will commence in the 800-year-old Cistercian Abbey of Holycross, near Thurles, Co. Tipperary from Sunday next, September 8th 2019, until Monday September 16th 2019.

A veritable swarm of much appreciated colleagues, latter in the form of Stewards, Caterers, Musicians, Vocalists, Eucharistic Ministers, Gardaí, Clergy etc. have been drafted in to assist and organise this year’s enormous annual event, which will see over 70,000 people pass down the Abbey’s ancient isles, during this eight day ecclesiastical event.

Times Of Devotions and Mass

Weekdays:- Each Weekday Devotions and Mass will be held at 7:00am, 10:30am, 4:30pm, 7:30pm and 9:30pm.
Sundays:- On Sundays at 7:00am, 10:30am, 12:30pm, 7:30pm & 9:30pm.

Extra Sessions:
Friday September 13th – Penitential Rite at 7.30pm & 9.30pm.
Saturday September 14th – Anointing of the Sick at 2:00pm.
Sunday September 15th – Blessing of Infants at 2.30pm.

Confessions will take place throughout each weekday.

As part of their commitment to public service broadcasting, Tipp Mid-West Community Radio has announced that they will provide live broadcasts each day, from the Holycross Abbey Novena.

Dates and times of Radio broadcasts from the Holycross Abbey Novena are as follows.

Sunday, 8th September – 7.30p.m.
Monday, 9th September – 7.30p.m.
Tuesday, 10t September – 7.30p.m.
Wednesday, 11th September – 7.30p.m.
Thursday, 12th September – 7.30p.m.
Friday, 13th September – 4:30p.m.
Saturday, 14th September – 2:00p.m. (Anointing of the Sick)
Sunday, 15th September – 7.30p.m.
Monday, 16th September – 7.30p.m.

[ Note:- Tipperary Mid West Community Radio Station can be accessed on wavelengths 104.8fm, 106.7fm and online.]

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Borrisoleigh Festival Begins This Weekend

Borrisoleigh Festival July 4th to 7th 2019

The annual Borrisoleigh Festival returns again this weekend; bigger and better than ever before.
The festival is being run in tandem with “The Arty Rooster Arts Festival”, which runs for the entire week from 1st July.

Overall Winner of the 2018 Wheelbarrow Competition with her entry ‘The Dogbox’ is Kathleen Ryan (left) with her sister Margaret and mother Effie (RIP)

The growing “International Wheelbarrow Extravaganza”, promises some wonderful creations. The competition is open to everyone to submit their modified wheelbarrows to be in with a chance to win some great prizes. Your imagination is the only limiting factor in this unique competition.

The Arty Rooster‘ will feature shop-front exhibitions, workshops, demonstrations, talks and performances, including an oil painting demonstration by artist Jim Donnelly on Saturday morning and a short play written by Ciarnad Ryan. The play is based on events which took place during the War of Independence and will be performed on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday in the function room in Finn’s Bar. Follow ‘The Arty Rooster’ on Facebook for full schedule updates.

The annual walk with the Bush and Briar Ramblers takes place on Saturday July 6th, walking part of the Beara Breifne Way from Greenane to Latteragh. Registration is at 8.30am in the Community Centre.

Award winning photographer Tom Doherty will be hosting a photo walk, giving tips on how to take great photos on a walk around Borrisoleigh starting at 11:00am in The Square. This should prove useful to anyone planning on entering the festivals Instagram Competition. Be sure to use the hashtag #BorrisFest19 when posting festival photos on Instagram to be in with a chance to win some great prizes. After the Official Opening with Lord Mayor Paddy Dolan and special guest on Saturday, there will be a Jiving Competition and Social Dancing with ‘Phil Maher’s Band’. The band ‘Ebony’ will finish off the night; from 10:00pm to 12:00 midnight.

A fire performer will be thrilling spectators throughout Saturday night with a number of performances from 8:00pm and Hot Chocolate and Wraps will be available from ‘The Hungry Horse’.

Sunday 7th July has a packed schedule from 2:00pm with the ‘Wheelbarrow Extravaganza’, live music, kid’s entertainment and lots more. The individual wheelbarrow categories are: Best Environmental; Best Miniature Garden; and Most Imaginative.

Entries open on Sunday 7th July 2.00 – 4.30 p.m. No entry fees. This year there is a new ‘Commercial’ Category. Local businesses can showcase their business in a wheelbarrow in the centre of Borrisoleigh for the duration of the Festival. €10 advance entry fee. Wheelbarrows can be displayed from 1st July – 7th July. There will be a public vote for the best overall wheelbarrow on Sunday afternoon. Votes cost €1.00 each. So, take another glance at that old wheelbarrow in the corner of the garden, and imagine what an amazing spectacle it would make with a little bit of ingenuity and TLC. And don’t forget to use #BorrisFest19 when uploading your photos to Instagram!

At 2.30pm in the Community Centre there is a Make Up Demonstration with MUA Kayley Moylan, admission is €8. Kids entertainment will feature Bouncy Castles, Disco Dome, Gladiators, Gaming Van and Hawkeye Powershot Competition. There will be a BBQ in the village square also on Sunday evening and a Hobby horse competition from 6.30pm to 7.30pm.

Live music starts at 2:00pm on Sunday with DJ Matt Ryan and a host of wonderful performers throughout the day. Starting with Paudi Bourke at 4pm, Dufrane 4.30pm, The Mangled Badgers 6pm and finishing with Silver Dollar from 8pm until late.

All in all, it promises to be a terrific festival with something for everyone and all ages. Pick up a copy of the festival booklet in any local shops for full schedule of events and follow Borrisoleigh Festival on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for regular updates.

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Beatified Archbishop Of Cashel, Co. Tipperary.

Thurles History, our unidentified ‘Key Strength’.

If I mention just a few names :- ‘The National Gallery of Ireland’; ‘The valley of Glendalough’; ‘The Rock of Cashel’; ‘Newgrange’; ‘St Patrick’s Cathedral’; ‘The Old Library at Trinity College’; ‘Glasnevin Cemetery’; ‘The Chester Beatty Library’; ‘The Jeanie Johnston Tallship’; ‘Kilmainham Gaol’; ‘Christ Church Cathedral’ and finally ‘Kilkenny Castle’, you will immediately identify same as household names in relation to just some of Ireland’s many tourist attractions.

So, ask yourself what have all of the above got in common? Upon reflection you will find the answer is of course ‘History’, and while some of the above national visitor attractions named are free to enter, others are costing our tourists, according to Tripadvisor, (Click on the shown links to see for yourself), some are €49.00, other €19.80 or even €60.00 per person, in order to get a guided tour.

Here in Thurles Co. Tipperary while we whine and moan about limited footfall on our streets, we have failed miserably, down through the years, to fully acknowledge and highlight our rich history. We also continue to appoint individuals with absolutely no knowledge, not just of our history, but also with limited ability in encouraging tourism.

Tipperary, The Place, The Time

Remember the embarrassing Tipperary, the Place, the Time PR stunt and the expensive lunch ordered for political and sporting dignitaries! Read here all about the then:- International Access, Unrivalled talent pools, Proven success stories, World-class infrastructure, Lifestyle and Culture, attempting to attract business to a Tipperary devoid of basic rural broadband and any advance factories. Here is where resignations should have been offered and not just by officials in IDA Ireland and Enterprise Ireland, for their sheer PR stupidity, not to mention the waste of taxpayers’ money.

March 4 Tipp Group, we salute and support your endeavours, you got at least a promise of your ‘Ring Road’.

We first raised the question of ‘Key Strengths’ here on Thurles.Info on June 15th last (2019), [Click Here] pointing out that History had not been included in the list of key fortes and strong suits, identified with regard to Thurles town.

[The Key strengths that were identified were named:- Arts & Culture, Business, Sport and Education. Note: Arts being creative endeavours and disciplines, while Culture demonstrates the shared values, practices and goals, that define people residing in a particular or in this case a forgotten region.]

You can read our History Category Blogs from here.

Honouring our promise made on June 15th last, and in preparation for National Heritage Week in Thurles; we will attempt to highlight the massive national, historical importance and physical presence of the Cathedral of the Assumption. So do please now read on.

Archbishop of Cashel, Dr. Dermot (Darby) O’Hurley

The word “Cathedral” derives from the Latin word “Cathedra” meaning ‘a chair with armrests. A cathedral is simply an ordinary church, but unlike an ordinary church, in a cathedral church the presiding bishop has an ‘Episcopal Chair’, thus signifying his teaching authority. The chair is not solely associated with just Roman Catholic churches, but is found similarly in Orthodox and Anglican Communion churches also.

Episcopal Chair in the Cathedral of the Assumption, Thurles.

The Episcopal Chair or more commonly called a “Bishop’s Throne” in the Cathedral of the Assumption, here in Thurles, can be found positioned to the viewers right hand side, as they face the main Altar.

Dr. Dermot (Darby) O’Hurley (Irish-Diarmaid Ó hUrthuile), Archbishop of Cashel, was born in Lickadoon Castle, Co. Limerick in 1530, about 80.0km (50 mls), from Thurles. His father William O’Hurley, being a Steward to James Fitzgerald, 14th Earl of Desmond, ensured that Dermot gained a good education through tutors and was later sent abroad to study law at the Catholic University of Louvain, (Leuven), back then part of the Burgundian Netherlands, now part of today’s Belgium, where from here he graduated with an M.A. in 1551.

In 1581 Pope Gregory XIII (Ugo Boncompagni 1502- 1585) asked Dermot O’Hurley, then still a layman, to become the new Archbishop of Cashel. Having accepted this post; he was ordained on 13th August 1581 in Rome and on September 11th of that same year he was officially appointed Archbishop of Cashel. He would never arrive.

Here in Ireland then under English Rule, the Penal Laws were in force, leaving the new Archbishop no alternative but to return to Ireland in secret, to avoid capture by the spies of the reigning English Queen Elizabeth 1st. In 1570 latter Queen had been excommunicated by Pope Pius V; leaving Dr. Dermot O’Hurley under no illusion as to his new appointment. Same would mean that he must reside living as a fugitive, in order to carry on his ministry.

Smuggled into Ireland in 1583 he landed at Drogheda in the midst of the second Desmond Rebellion (1579-1583), to stay with Thomas Fleming, an Irish Peer and 10th Baron of Slane. Departing for his diocese Dr. O’Hurley arrived in Carrick-on-Suir, where he expected to come under the protection of the then 10th Earl of Ormond, Thomas Butler, Viscount Thurles.

Before leaving and possibly unknown to himself, he was recognised by government spies; the latter who notified Adam Loftus (then Protestant Archbishop of Dublin), and Sir Henry Wallop, (Lord Justice).

Now faced with the prospect of being arrested himself, and under threat, the forenamed Baron Thomas Fleming immediately set out in pursuit, apprehending the Archbishop in Carrick-on-Suir, where he was then residing with the Protestant Thomas Butler, 10th Earl of Ormond and Lord Treasurer of Ireland.

Arrest & Torture of Dr Dermot O’Hurley

Baron Fleming now took Dr. O’Hurley back to Dublin Castle and by October 8th 1583, he was a prisoner in Dublin Castle.

Upon being questioned he admitted to being a Roman Catholic, however any effort to make him inform on other leading Roman Catholic members was to prove fruitless.
Lord Justice Sir Henry Wallop and the Earl of Kildare, Thomas Walsingham (Secretary to Queen Elizabeth 1st), both feared that Dr. O’Hurley was actively participating in a plot to overthrow English rule here in Ireland. Walsingham now ordered that Dr. O’Hurley be subjected to torture; accused of being a member of the Roman Inquisition. His torture included the filling of his booted legs with oil, before roasting them over an open fire.

Historian Richard Stanihurst, latter an Irish alchemist, translator, poet and historian, born in Dublin (1547–1618), described his particular gruesome torture: “In the Castle Yard, before the officials of the government, the executioner placed the archbishop’s feet and calves in tin boots filled with oil. They then fastened his feet in wooden shackles or stocks, and placed fire under them. The boiling oil so penetrated the feet and legs that morsels of skin and flesh fell off and left the bones bare.”

Screaming throughout his torturous agony, “Jesus, son of David, protect me”, he persistently continued to protest stating that his mission was one of peace and that he had no information whatsoever to give to his captors.

His captors then resorted to bribery, demanding that he renounce his Catholic faith and embrace Protestantism, but to no avail.

Fearing that they might kill him; his torturers then discontinued their actions and later he was sent for trial by a Military Tribunal, before being quickly sentenced to death.

Execution of Dr. Dermot O’Hurley Archbishop of Cashel.

On Saturday June 20th, 1584, an order for Dr. O’Hurley’s execution was received from England. He was taken early in the morning from his cell in Ship Street, to a swampy area near St. Stephen’s Green, latter then known as Hoggen Green, (Today the College Green/Dame Street area) to be hanged.

We understand that his corpse was thrown into a ditch, where it was later recovered by friends of the Archbishop. Same took his remains and buried them in the small churchyard of St. Kevin in Camden Row, Dublin.

Today the Church is in ruins, but for many years afterwards his burial plot became a place of pilgrimage for many Dublin Roman Catholic believers.

Dr. Dermot O’Hurley remains one of the most celebrated of Irish Catholic Martyrs, and was ‘beatified’ [Declared officially to be a holy person, usually the first step towards making them a saint in the Roman Catholic Church.] by Pope John Paul II (Karol Józef Wojtyła 1920 – 2005) on September 27th 1992.

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