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It’s A Good Friday For Pubs & Restaurants

Legislation to end the 90-year old prohibition on pubs from opening on Good Friday, has now passed all stages in Seanad Éireann.

The Intoxicating Liquor (Amendment) Bill was introduced by Independent Senator Billy Lawless. Senator Lawless of course sold his family’s dairy farm in the late 1970’s, and was running several bars and hotels in Galway by the early 1990’s. Today he claims that a message has been sent to the world that “Ireland is a pluralist, globalist, forward-thinking country”, and has made yet “another progressive step in Ireland’s long journey in the separation of Church and State”.

Of course ‘Binge drinking in Ireland,’ according to Senator Lawless, is caused by the sale of low cost alcohol from certain licensed premises.  [I agree Senator, sure is not low cost sales of Cocaine the reason for compulsive, out of control, use of drugs.  Ops, no, sorry, Senator, a Cocaine habit I believe is very expensive, and funding of same leads to most of the crime currently being committed in today’s pluralist, globalist, forward-thinking country, where Seanad Éireann little by little remain hell bent on successfully separating Church from State.]

Senator Lawless pointed out that the new legislation will apply to all pubs and restaurants, and licensed premises will be able to open on Good Friday, after this Bill is passed through the Dáil, before being signed into law by the President.

Perhaps Seanad Éireann would be better off introducing a Bill correcting issues such as the 1,200 children living in Direct Provision In Ireland, whose human rights as children have been negatively impacted. In thirty years time will this issue become yet another 21st century ‘Magdalene Laundry scenario’, seeking justice under yet another expensive Commission of Investigation.

Perhaps we should remove Good Friday from the list of Church Holidays altogether, and make it just another normal working day for bankers, post office workers and civil servants, thus completing the further separation of State from Church.

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Who Hath Ears To Hear, Let Him Hear

“Who hath ears to hear, let him hear,”  –  Gospel of St. Mark Ch. 4: V. 9.

One afternoon an Irish politician was riding along in his chauffeur driven Ford Excursion, 14 Seater Stretched Limo, when he spotted two homeless men sitting on the roadside apparently eating grass.  Having ordered his driver to stop, he got out of his vehicle to further investigate.

He addressed both men, “Why are you eating grass?”

“We don’t have any money for food”, the homeless men both replied in unison “We have to eat grass”.

“Well, then, you can come with me to my house and I’ll feed you”, the TD said. “But sir, we both have wives and a total of 12 children with us”, stated the homeless men, “You can see them over there, starving under those trees”.

“Bring them along also” the TD replied.

Having crammed 4 children into the vehicles trunk / boot, the other 12 homeless individuals climbed aboard the interior of the plush 14 seater.

Once under-way, one of the homeless men turned to the TD sitting up front with the driver and in expressing his gratitude stated, “Sir, you are too kind. Thank you for taking all of us with you”.

The TD replied “Glad to do it. You’ll really love my place – I didn’t get a chance to cut the one acre of lawn to the rear of my home so far this year, and the unspoilt grass there is almost one foot high!”

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Human Rights Are About Ensuring Human Dignity

handsWe saw the despicable decision, made earlier this week, in the case of an elderly couple in their mid to late 80’s, who had applied as a couple for the Fair Deal Scheme. It was decided that the couple should be separated for the first time, after 63 years of marriage together.

This decision was taken by one or more over paid bureaucrats in the employment of the Health Service Executive (HSE), devoid of Christianity and ignorant of the very notion of human rights.  It would appear that the press together with TV and Radio coverage, are now essential in order to gain some small modicum of social justice in this country.

Living, as I once believed, in a mainly Christian country; this couple’s particular plight, brought about by these thoughtless individuals, reminded me of the following poem:-

“An Old Lady’s Poem”

(The original author of this poem is unknown.)

What do you see, nurses, what do you see?
What are you thinking when you’re looking at me?
A crabby old woman, not very wise,
Uncertain of habit, with faraway eyes?

Who dribbles her food and makes no reply
When you say in a loud voice, “I do wish you’d try!”
Who seems not to notice the things that you do,
And forever is losing a stocking or shoe.

Who, resisting or not, lets you do as you will,
With bathing and feeding, the long day to fill.
Is that what you’re thinking? Is that what you see?
Then open your eyes, nurse; you’re not looking at me.

I’ll tell you who I am, as I sit here so still,
As I do your bidding, as I eat at your will.
I’m a small child of ten, with a father and mother,
Brothers and sisters, who love one another.

A young girl of sixteen, with wings on her feet,
Dreaming that soon now a lover she’ll meet.
A bride soon at twenty, my heart gives a leap,
Remembering the vows that I promised to keep.

At twenty-five now, I have young of my own,
Who need me to guide them in a secure happy home.
A woman of thirty; my young now growing fast,
Bound to each other with ties that should last.

At forty, my young sons have grown and are gone,
But my man is beside me to see I don’t mourn.
At fifty once more, babies play round my knee,
Again, we know children, my loved one and me.

Dark days are upon me, my husband is dead;
I look at the future, I shudder with dread.
For my young are all rearing young of their own,
And I think of the years and the love that I’ve known.

I’m now an old woman, and nature is cruel;
It is jest to make old age look like a fool.
The body, it crumbles, grace and vigour depart,
There is now a stone, where once was a heart.

But inside this old carcass a young girl still dwells,
And now and again my battered heart swells.
I remember the joys, I remember the pain,
And I’m loving and living life over again.

I think of the years, all too few, gone so fast,
And accept the stark fact that nothing can last.
So, open your eyes people, open and see
Not a crabby old woman; look closer, see me.

Human rights are, after all, about safeguarding human dignity, as opposed to just catering for human need, and therefore must embody Christian standards, when decisions regarding old people are to be determined.

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Help-To-Buy Incentive Scheme Is To Be Examined

The current Irish Minister for Housing, Mr Eoghan Murphy, has acknowledged that he will be reviewing the Rebuilding Ireland housing strategy, which could see “The help-to-buy incentive”, geared to encourage first time home buyers, scrapped.

The scheme was first introduced by Fine Gael in last October’s budget, to encourage and enabled first time buyers of new build properties.  Basically, if you were a first-time buyer who either bought or self-built a new residential property between the 19th July 2016 and 31st December 2019, you were entitled to claim a refund of income tax and DIRT paid over the previous 4 tax years.

This new scheme’s introduction now appears to indicate that rather than helping to encourage building, the scheme has in fact pushed existing house prices to reach dizzier heights.

Fears justifiably now exist that if this new scheme were to be cancelled, the effects could cause an even further price amplification; suggesting that the Housing Minister will most likely focus his attentions on how to increase the supply of building stock; latter a strategy which has failed dismally, despite incentives.

It should be remembered that according to the 2016 census, held on the 24th April last year (2016), some 183,000 vacant homes exists around the country, while some 8,000 people continue to reside in emergency accommodation.

Surely it would have been cheaper to pay incentives to 8,000 people to move out of our over-crowded cities, and take up residence in the pure air of our Irish villages and smaller towns, while also partially replenishing our rural population, latter forced to take the boat to find work.

By giving €10,000 and a social house to each family currently residing in emergency accommodation; Mr Murphy can indeed be assured that the promise by former Minister Mr Simon Coveney, (“All homeless families in Dublin will be moved out of hotel accommodation by 1st July 2017.”), will in truth be met by at least the date of August 31st.

Remember Fianna Fáil’s attempts at the movement of departments and power away from a single administrative centre; to other locations. It was called ‘Decentralization’, so why not apply this idea to those forced to reside in over priced emergency accommodation? Remember we are talking about people without homes, not unsackable Civil Servants and their Unions seeking outrageous relocation payments.

But of course it is so important that we do not upset Ireland’s bankers and property developers, after all they have been so considerate of the Irish people!

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Despite Election Promises, No Real Support For Tipperary Tourism

Ireland’s favourite tourist attractions were announced yesterday with Dublin’s Guinness Storehouse emerging, not surprisingly, the No1 favourite. Figures supplied by Fáilte Ireland show visitors to the Dublin Brewery increased by some 10% over the previous 2015 holiday season, perhaps possibly because arrogance amongst its employees is not tolerated and non existent.

In no particular order the Top Five Irish fee-paying attractions during the 2016 Holiday Season were:-
The Guinness Storehouse, Dublin – 1,647,408 (Up 10%)
Dublin Zoo, Dublin – 1,143,908 (Up 3%).
The National Aquatic Centre Dublin – 1,037,992 (Up 4.5%).
Trinity College – Book of Kells, Dublin – 890,781 (Up 6%).
The Cliffs of Moher Visitor Experience, Co Clare – 1,427,166 (Up 14%).

In no particular order the Top Five Irish free-to-enter attractions during the 2016 Holiday Season were:-
The National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin – 755,577 (Up 5%).
Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin – 584,856 (Up 20%).
National Botanic Gardens – 583,539 (Up 5.5%).
National Museum of Ireland – 479,261 (Up 4.8%).
Doneraile Wildlife Park, Co. Cork – 480,000 (Up 11%).

And now for the trick question:- “What have 8 out of the 10 attractions, above named, all got in common?”

Think carefully – OK time Up – Answer “All 8 out of the 10 attractions, above named, are to be found in the heartland of Dublin’s city Centre, and most have or continue to received massive government funding.”

Looking at these attractions from a rapidly expiring ‘Rural Ireland’ perspective and working from memory:-

Dublin Zoo, Dublin – 2011 saw the expiry of a once-off €18m State Capital Investment Programme provided first in 2006 for its redevelopment.
National Aquatic Centre Dublin – Built at a capital cost of €62.5 million.
Book of Kells, Dublin – In 2011 Leo Varadkar announced an allocation of €2.7 million in funding for the exhibition of the Book of Kells, to improve public access to the precious manuscript and the overall visitor experience.
National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin – In 2014 €32 million handed over for renovations.
National Museum of Ireland – The annual grant by Government is approximately €13m annually.

See other tourism funding for our States Capital City

Commenting on the list of Ireland’s top attractions, CEO of Fáilte Ireland, Mr Paul Kelly, stated: “Attractions are one of the key reasons why many overseas visitors choose Ireland as a destination, they create the variety of experiences that make for an enjoyable holiday and are the basis of visitor memories and moments to share that are critical to the growth of tourism in Ireland.”

But of course such attractions should ‘create that variety of experiences’ only in Dublin City and County; would you not agree Mr Kelly?

Surely issues here of of disparity, inequality, discrimination or imbalance; call it what you will.

Maybe, perhaps, perchance, or possibly our five county elected TD’s, namely Mr Jacki Cahill, Mr Mattie McGrath, Mr Michael Lowry, Mr Alan Kelly and Mr Seamus Healy, might like to raise this issue in Dáil Éireann. Maybe, perhaps, perchance, or possibly they could be reminded by their local supporting Co. Councillors, before they themselves go skiving off on holidays, having achieved absolutely nothing for their county since last election day, Friday 26th February, 2017.

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