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Hazardous Waste Disposal Opportunity For Tipperary Householders

WasteHouseholders in Thurles and across Tipperary are being encouraged to avail of an upcoming opportunity to dispose of their hazardous wastes free of charge.

The Southern Region Waste Management Office has teamed up with Local Authorities across the region, including Tipperary County Council, to operate bring centres for the collection of hazardous domestic waste, one of which will be located at the Roscrea Civic Amenity Site on Saturday January 23rd from 8.30am to 3.30 pm (closed for lunch from 12.30 pm to 1.00 pm).

Waste items including lead acid batteries, cooking and engine oil, oil filters, paints and lacquers, paint strippers and cleaners, old medicines, pesticides and herbicides, fluorescent tubes and household aerosols can be deposited free of charge.

Staff from Tipperary County Council’s Environment section will be present for the event, which is funded by the Department of the Environment, Heritage & Local Government, while information guides on green cleaning and green gardening will also be made available.

“Through hosting this free of charge ‘drop-off day’, we are providing householders throughout Tipperary with an excellent opportunity to dispose of their hazardous wastes in a manner that protects human health and the environment,”  explained Pauline McDonogh, Regional Waste Prevention Co-ordinator, Southern Waste Region.

Householders are being reminded that each waste type brought to the Roscrea Civic Amenity must be clearly identifiable, segregated and packaged to avoid leaks and minimise risks.

The forthcoming drop-off day is an initiative of the Southern Region Waste Management Plan. Ten local authorities in Tipperary, Cork, Clare, Limerick, Waterford, Carlow, Kilkenny, Wexford and Kerry have been set a number of key targets in relation waste prevention activities.

Householders can get additional information about the event and about how to manage hazardous waste from www.southernwasteregion.ie.

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Suir Haven Sensory Garden Thurles Now Complete

Suir Haven

Pictured L-R, John O’Shaughnessy (Clancy Construction, Drangan), J.J. O’Sullivan (O’Sullivan Construction Ltd, Littleton) with employees Ciaran King and Dave Fleming, pictured here adding the final touches to the Suir Haven Sensory Garden in Thurles.

With the arrival of new railings and glass panels, the Suir Haven Sensory Garden is now complete. A huge ‘Thank You’ to the many local construction industry members involved; each who donated materials, time and labour, totally free of charge.

For those less familiar with Suir Haven, same is a community based support centre where everyone is welcome; whether one is currently living with cancer or affected by it.  These persons can include clients, family, carers, children and friends.

All of the cancer support services available are provided free of charge. In fact this wonderful facility is truly a ‘drop-in centre’, meaning that anybody who wishes to avail of the services provided can call in without referral from a General Practitioner (GP).

The centre which is located in a non-clinical setting, offers not just emotional support, but also counselling, practical help and information; all provided in a safe, positive and totally confidential environment.

Suir Haven Sensory Garden is expected to officially open in early Spring 2016 and we hope to bring you further details of all those involved in this worthwhile project later.

However in the meantime “What a great sense of community spirit by those involved – well done to all and again thank you.”

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Thurles – St Mary’s Graveyard Project Update

A project undertaken to reclaim / transform the old late 13th century St. Mary’s graveyard, begun last November (2014) here in Thurles, is progressing very satisfactory. The former part dump and weed infested “Gods Acre” is now 50% complete thanks to Tús operatives, Thurles Municipal District Council and the many local people who have undertaken to support this project.

With three car trailer loads of broken dishes, plastic and glass bottles, bicycle and electrical parts etc now removed, some interesting pieces of old Thurles history were also uncovered. These located surface artefacts included two badly decomposed 19th and 20th century hand guns, some interesting old bottles, a few 19th and 20th century coins and a hand-made, open fire, wire, fish griddle (Great Famine Period); this latter now fully restored by the ingenuity of Littleton resident Mr Michael Bannon.

The part proceeds of a local crime were also uncovered; hidden under a large stone, taking on the form of a 14 year old stolen purse, containing various credit type cards.  (In all cases the appropriate authorities were notified.)

Click HERE to view progress to date in High Definition.

Thurles – Undertaking A Visitor Attraction Project For Themselves

Of course the spring crop of Cherry blossom, Blue Bells, Three Cornered Leeks, Snowdrops and Lent Lilies have all departed for yet another year. So too now fading are the summer crop of Solomon Seal, Lily of the Valley, Primroses, Yellow Loosestrife and Lungworth. However the Common Poppy, Chinese Black Mondo Grass, White Foxgloves, Fleece Flower, Buddleia Bushes, Elephant Ears, African daisy, Marigolds and Feverfew all continue to grant late summer /autumn colour to this most historic of Tipperary graveyards.

The first gravelled footpath, one of four planned to guide visitors around this historic oasis, is also in place, joining the existing Thurles Memorial Garden.

To date this project has cost a minuscule €800.00 in financial funding for the massive work undertaken and a huge ‘Thank You’ must now go to all the volunteer supporters / advisor’s to this project and in particular to the Tús operatives and Thurles Municipal District Council (Administrator Michael Ryan).  A ‘Thank You’ also to Aileen O’Sullivan and family (U.S.A.) who handsomely contributed to the purchase of garden furniture, yet to be installed later this year in this area, (More details will appear regarding this installation later).

Of course if there are any Politicians out there who feel that funding should /can be made available to support / progress this ongoing project more speedily, perhaps they could let us know.

How can you the people of this community further assist in this new project?
(1) Do you have any “Overcrowded Perennials” in your garden drastically in need of thinning? Remember overcrowded perennials often have fewer and smaller flowers than their well-spaced and divided counterparts.

(2) Do you have relatives buried in St Mary’s Graveyard? Perhaps, finance permitting of course, you would like to take this opportunity to have the headstone cleaned, lettering repainted or a grave kerb added, replaced or repaired. Unable to undertake this work yourself, then talk to James Slattery, Tel 0504 – 22219, who specialises in dealing with ancient limestone headstones.

(3) Are you feeling generous? Why not make a small financial contribution to this worthwhile Thurles history / environmental conservation project. Your donation and full details of how your money was spent will be publicly acknowledged here on Thurles.Info in future regular news updates.

Note: Extreme care has been taken to ensure that this historic burial ground is respected in full, firstly, with regards to the rights of the living family members of those deceased, and secondly, in regard to the rules already put in place by the Heritage Council with regard to the Guidance for the Care, Conservation and Recording of Historic Graveyards.

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Common Teasel – A Manna From Heaven

“Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin and yet I say unto you,
that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.”
St. Luke – Chapter 12, Verses 28 & 29.

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The Common Teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris) plant is just one of many wild flowers recently introduced into St. Mary’s Graveyard here in Thurles Co. Tipperary, as part of restoration work being carried out to convert the latter into a garden and urban wild flower reserve.

Observed by many as just a species of weed, the Common Teasel (Teazel) plant is well worth growing in well managed gardens, if only for use in dried flower arrangements. Teasel is a biennial plant which germinates in its first year; while flowering in its second. In the first year it appears as a rosette of spine-coated leaves, which die in the second year, as it diverts its energy into growing its tall, often up to 2 meter high stems.

Common Teasel is a real nature lover’s plants, protected by thorns the full length of its stem. Its cone shaped flower heads, the seeds of which begin turning brown in winter; gives to the observer the impression of being a giant cotton bud. Prior to seeding, it displays tiny lavender / purple coloured flowers to be found clustered together in the form of separated rings appearing up and down its flower head. These flowers quickly attract bumblebees, butterflies and other flying creatures and the later seeds produced, entice many wild birds, particularly Goldfinches, who arrive in vast numbers to feast.

The many uses attributed to the Common Teasel plant.

The first references to the huge important uses of the Teasel plant began before the 12th century. The Romans called the plant ‘Lavacrum Veneris’, meaning the ‘Basin (or Bath-house) of Venus’. This name refers to the fact that the plant collects little pools of water at the base of its lower stem leaves (See picture no.2 above) providing drinking water for insects. However this water collected also insures that it keeps its own roots watered, when, aided by the wind, it sways to spill this collected water supply unto the soil at its base. Irish Water (Uisce Eireann) activists who today correctly (to my mind) argue that water is more than just a human need; that it is in fact a God given human right, would do well to observe this plant.  Such observation will surely prove that access to safe drinking water should never depend on affordability; but rather that the provision of future clean water to the less well-off, be no longer perceived as charity, but rather as a legal entitlement to be shared by all God’s creatures equally.

During the eighteenth century, the water collected by the leaves of Teasel plants was believed to remove freckles and was also used to soothe sore eyes. The roots have also been used to treat warts, sores and other skin problems, as a stomach aid, as an analgesic for pain relief, as an anti-inflammatory and as a stimulant for the nervous system.  Teasel Root is widely used in conjunction with antibiotics to treat Lyme Disease. It has the ability to pull bacteria from muscle tissue into the blood stream, thus enabling the human immune system to do its work naturally.

Whereas most modern textile processes have been mechanised, the barbs of Teasel plants continue to be used today in the woollen trade, since the spiny heads of this plant are gentler on wool and cloth materials; where stubborn tangles are encountered. In this process some 2,000 to 4,000 dried teasel heads are hand-picked and mounted on rotating drums known as a ‘Gigs’. The Gig then spins rapidly over the stretched surface of woollen cloth, thus separating the surface fibres, “raising the nap”.

Today modern snooker-table cloth surfaces, guardsmen’s tunics and the roof linings of Rolls-Royce cars are all still finished with Teasel heads and no machine has ever been devised that can do the job on cloth better than the Teasel. Indeed the Coat of Arms of the Cloth Workers’ Company, granted first in 1530, still proudly displays a golden Teasel head.

Teasel with its thorny spiked stems, when used in dried flower arranging, soon teaches the florist to wear gloves when cutting or handling the plant. In drying, remember to leave the stems to fully shed their seeds naturally, before cutting and hanging upside down. Properly handled and correctly dried these flowers will last for many years, making a bold statement in any future designed floral display.

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Question: Which Irish County Grows The Best Spuds?

 Which Irish county grows the best potatoes?

potatoflowerSupposedly first discovered by the Spaniards back in the 16th Century, and understood to have been eaten by the Peruvians some 2,000 years previously, our humble potato is still, by far, the most popular of all consumed vegetables. This versatile tuber can be boiled, chipped, steamed, baked, roasted and sautéed.

However according to An Bord Bia which held its All Ireland Quality Potato Championships recently, not surprisingly the winning county was identified as; yes you have guessed correctly, Co. Tipperary.

Last weekend at the Tullamore Show in Co Offaly, latter which is attended by some 60,000 people annually, potato grower Mr David Curran from Fethard, Co. Tipperary was crowned All Ireland Champion and quality spud producer.

According to An Bord Bia, this annual competition is designed not just to increase the level of awareness among growers, but to highlight what actually constitutes a top quality potato.

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