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Tipperary Man Appointed Chairperson Of Dairygold.

Mr John O’Gorman.

Clogheen, Co. Tipperary native, Mr John O’Gorman, this afternoon was elected the Chairperson of Ireland’s largest farmer-owned Co-Operative, Dairygold.

The Dairygold Co-Operative boasts 7,100 Shareholders, 2,900 milk suppliers and 1,250 staff working across its sites in Ireland, the UK, Germany, Spain and China. In 2017, Dairygold processed over 1.3 billion litres of milk from its Membership.

Holding a Bachelor degree in Accounting and Business Management and a Diploma in Corporate Direction, Food Business from UCC; Mr O’Gorman, was first elected to the Board of Dairygold in January 2013.

He is married to spouse Alison, with a family of three daughters, and previously served as Vice-Chairman of Dairygold, since just last year. He now replaces the former Chairperson Mr James Lynch, latter who served for the previous three years, thus having served out the maximum term permitted on the Board of Dairygold.

Mr O’Gorman stated that he was honoured to have been elected to serve as Chairperson of Dairygold, confirming the Co-Operative was a long-standing and ambitious organisation, holding deep commitment to both its membership and its shareholders. He also stated that he looked forward to working closely with the Board’s Chief Executive Mr Jim Woulfe, and his dedicated professional staff.

Having paid tribute to his outgoing predecessor, highlighting the latter’s great leadership and stewardship; he confirmed his enthusiasm to playing his part in Dairygold’s continued growth and future success.

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Tractor Girls Calendar 2018 On Sale Now

These 12 female Tipperary beauties have decided to pose nude for the ‘Tractor Girls Calendar 2018’ in support of Billy Goulding.  Photo: Tom Doherty.

Twelve lovely Tipperary ladies have braved the Irish weather to pose naked beside a tractor; their motivation, to raise funds for a five-year-old, latter who is presently paralysed from the neck down.

When just two and a half years old; Master Billy Goulding was playing with his sister outside in his garden when he took a fall and found himself unable to get back on to his feet.

Rushed to Limerick hospital before being transferred to Temple Street Hospital; his parents would later learn the disappointing news that their son had Transverse Myelitis, latter a neurological condition in which the spinal cord becomes inflamed. This inflammation damages nerve fibres, thus causing them to lose their myelin coating, leading to decreased electrical conductivity in the central nervous system.

Billy, who now is required to travels twice a year to the Stoke Mandeville Hospital, London for intensive physiotherapy, requires 24-hour care.

As with everything; over the years the cost of caring for Billy has greatly amplified, so the local female community have taken the similar route as that taken by the Knapely branch of the Women’s Institute (1999) in Yorkshire, England, to discreetly pose nude. (Remember the 2003 comedy film ‘Calendar Girls’, starring the gorgeous Helen Mirren).

The Tractor Girls Calendar 2018 is now available for sale and if you would like to help Billy on his road to recovery, you can also donate HERE on the Facebook page ‘Billy’s Recovery’, with calendars costing €15 each.  Share and support.

Well done girls, you prove, in the equality stakes, that once again females are far superior to males.

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What Has Five Hearts, No Eyes, Ears Or Teeth

They have five hearts, no eyes, no ears and no teeth, but one large one of the species can produce four to five kilos (9 to 11 lbs) of valuable fertiliser in just one year. They are hailed as the “intestines of the earth”, and according to my late dear grandmother, Eliza-Jane, the organic matter they produce becomes, “the mother of a healthy nosebag”.

They will wander unto Tarmacadam surfaces in search of leaves and breathing through their skin, you can find up to 1,000,000 of them living invisibly in any one-acre field. Back in 1881 Charles Darwin, the English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution; in a statement wrote: “It may be doubted whether there are many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world, as have these lowly organized creatures.”   They are “more powerful than the African elephant and more important to the economy than the cow.”

I speak of course of the lowly earth worm, to which the poet William Shakespeare in his play ‘Hamlet’ (Act 4, Scene 3) shows he was well aware of their capable transformative power, “A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm.”

There are some twenty-seven species of earthworm to be found recorded as existing here in Irish soil. They burrow beneath the ground, consuming through their digestive system, micro-organisms, decomposing organic matter such as roots and leaves, sand grains and soil. As a result, vital minerals and nutrients are added to the soil, making it healthier and richer.

In previous generations; long before our more acquired knowledge of agricultural science, the ancients knew well when to plant crops. They understood that when the ground is cold, earth worms bury themselves deeper to avail of warmer soil, thus granting the farmer / gardener information on the temperate of the soil, prior to sowing.

Flatworms

Alas, back about 1963 we saw the first arrival of the New Zealand flatworm, (Arthurdendyus Triangulates) first recorded in Northern Ireland. It took scientists until around 1983, to discovered a possible link between low earthworm populations and the presence of flatworms. Since then, it has been established that flatworms; which inadvertently arrived here through nursery imports of potted plants from abroad, is an aggressive predator of our native earthworm. In recent years same have been widely recorded in the Republic of Ireland, especially in Co. Mayo, and now established, they are beginning to migrate slowly onto adjacent land.

Studies show that when the flatworm locates an earthworm near the earth’s surface, it secretes a digestive juice which in turn will dissolve the earthworm into a kind of gooey soup, which the former then digests. Once the flatworm becomes established, the native Irish earthworm population will be annihilated.

Earthworms are most definitely a gardeners friend and are vital to healthy rich soil, so for this reason always use a garden fork, rather than a spade, when digging to reduce cutting them up when turning over earth.

Finally, tread softly, because you may be treading on your best friend, and when next time ‘the wife’ refers to you as “a miserable little worm”, do feel complimented 😏.

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Safe Disposal Of Hazardous Farm Waste

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as and from yesterday, farmers across Ireland will once again have an opportunity to safely dispose of hazardous wastes from their farms; same to be collected nationally at ten collection points, during the months of October and November.

The location and dates for this year’s farm hazardous waste collections in Co. Tipperary are as follows:

Date:  25th October – Location Nenagh Mart, Co. Tipperary.

Date:  14th November – Cahir Mart, Co. Tipperary.

Note: Collection centres will open from 9:30 am to 3:30 pm. on the dates shown above.

Hazardous wastes are unavoidably generated through the normal everyday running of a farm, from engine oils & filters to residues of pesticides; and out-of-date veterinary medicines. The removal of these potentially dangerous substances represents a major step in improving farm safety, while reducing the serious pollution risks associated with accidental spillages.

Over the course of this campaign, some 2,000 farmers are expected to participate by bringing along surplus agri-chemicals and other hard-to-manage wastes. The safe disposal of these waste products is important for every farmer in keeping the farmyard safe for themselves and their family; in producing quality-assured products; and in maintaining Ireland’s green and sustainable image.

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Funds Awarded To Study Crop Protection & Clean Energy

Food Producers in Co. Tipperary have welcomed the news that the Environmental Protection Agency are to announce two new research projects, to be funded through the Science Foundation Ireland’s Investigator Programme.

As part of this strategic partnership the Environmental Protection Agency will co-fund two five-year research projectsv as follows:

  • Trinity College Dublin (Frank Wellmer) – looking at crop protection (A new avenue for crop protection: generating Brassica cultivars with supernumerary trichomes).
  • University of Limerick (Michael Zaworotko) – looking at clean energy (Green Adsorbents for Clean Energy).

These awards were announced at the Science Foundation Ireland Award Ceremony which took place in Trinity College Dublin this week.

Alice Wemaere, EPA Research Manager, stated: “We are delighted to build on the success of previous collaborations between the Environmental Protection Agency and Science Foundation Ireland. The two projects awarded funding today have the potential to yield significant environmental, economic and societal benefits for Ireland and will add to the range of EPA research that provides pathways to a low-carbon, sustainable future. The EPA wants to maximise the impact and benefit of its research funding for society and will therefore continue to seek co-funding and strategic collaboration opportunities to support environmental research.”

This SFI Programme is designed to support the development of world-class research and human capital in the areas of science, engineering and mathematics (STEM), that demonstrably support and underpin enterprise competitiveness and societal development in Ireland.

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