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sunrise: 7:40 am
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Thurles Estates & Streetscape Competition 2016

Thurles, The Cathedral Town

Refresh Thurles‘ have just launched their ‘Community Estates & Streetscape Competition‘.  This year 2016, will see the introduction of this particular competition for the first time and it is hoped that there will be a high rate of participation throughout the town.

Note: The closing date to enter this competition is May 31st, 2016 and for those local community areas wishing to take-part; entry is totally free.

Rules, Entry Forms, Categories & Prizes
The Community Estates & Streetscape Groupings, wishing to take part, must nominate a minimum of 3 persons to head up their individual groups, all of which should be listed on the entry form. There are four categories in the competition; Best Streetscape; Best Estate (1-30 houses); Best Estate (30 -70 Houses) and Best Estate 70+ Houses. The Prize in each case is €200.00, which is to be used to improve the winning Estate or Streetscape. Full details of the ‘Marking Scheme’ applicable can be found attached to the Application Form.

Entry forms are available from Refresh Thurles Committee Members or from the counter in Thurles Library. Alternatively text to Mobile (087) 2701689 or Email refreshthurles@gmail.com and they will have the form sent out to you. All completed entries can be put into a provided collection box in Thurles Library or returned by post to the address provided on the entry form.

Judging & Aims
Judging will take place during the months of July and August and the winners will be announced on September 1st. The aim of this initiative is to increase community participation and to give people an opportunity to demonstrate their ‘Pride of Place’. The work done by everyone will also contribute to further improving our ‘National Tidy Town’ marks for Thurles; latter which have increased over the last three years and hopefully will continue to improve in the years ahead. [See 2015 Category E results HERE]

This Competition is timely; as North Tipperary Leader Partnership (NTLP) have begun work on the Social Inclusion and Community Activation Program and perhaps there is some way that NTLP can help you to get a Community Group together and work towards this competition.

You can also contact the Leader Office situated on Kickham Street, Thurles, Tel: (0504) 90579 or contact Breada Ryan on Mobile (087) 9280755 or Trish Purcell on Mobile (087) 6978868. The Social Inclusion and Community Activation Programme (SICAP) offers a lot to the Community e.g. supports in the areas of Education; Employment; Enterprise Creation and Developing Capacity; in Community Groups.

Get Involved
Should you wish to get involved with ‘Refresh Thurles’ please contact them on Mobile (087) 270 1689 or Email refreshthurles@gmail.com – help in any way is much appreciated.

You can follow ‘Refresh Thurles’ on Facebook.

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Thurles Town Park To Be Officially Opened

Thurles town Park

A date for the official opening of the new Thurles Town Park has now been set. Same will take place at 3:00pm on Wednesday, April 27th, next.

This truly magnificent local amenity will be officially opened by Councillor Mr Seamus Hanafin, Cathaoirleach (English Translation – Chairperson) of Tipperary County Council and Councillor Mr John Hogan, latter Cathaoirleach of the local Templemore-Thurles, Municipal District.

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Thurles Reaction To Daylight Saving Act Of 1916

 

A reminder to all; this Sunday, between 1:00am and 2:00am, our clocks and watches will require to be skipped forward by one hour, thus depriving everyone of 60 minutes of precious shut-eye. Those with high tech gadgets e.g. Mobile Phones, Computers, Laptops etc. need not worry, as same time change will automatically occur without any required personal intervention on our part.

With 1916 on everyone’s lips this weekend, due to our celebrations commemorating the Irish Easter Rising, keep in mind that the ‘Daylight Saving Act’ was first introduced in that very same year. The first notion of attempting to not waste our daylight came about following a campaign which was begun in 1907, by the Edwardian British builder William Willett. It took until 1916 for those in authority to realise that this same time changing action would reduce considerable unnecessary energy consumption; while also saving countless lives, since fewer accidents occur in the mornings, when compared to our darker evenings.

So how did Thurles people and residents of our surrounding hinterland take to the first introduction of the ‘Daylight Saving Act’ in 1916? We find our answer recorded in the journal kept by Fr. Michael Maher C.C., Thurles, and then Secretary to the Archbishop of Cashel and Emly, Dr. John Mary Harty.

Fr. Michael Maher C.C. writes:

May 21st 1916
“A new ordinance came into force in the middle of May; it was called the ‘Daylight Saving Act‘. It meant that all clocks were to be put forward an hour on the morning of Sunday the 21st May at two o’clock and they were to be left at that standard until the night of the 1st of October.

NPG x91747; William Willett by Elliott & Fry

William Willett (1856 – 1915)

In former years, a Mr. [William] Willet of London frequently introduced a bill into the House of Commons to this effect, but it was always killed with ridicule. The poor man died a short time ago without having his hopes realised and now, when it was found that an immense saving would be effected through the curtailing of artificial light, and as economy was recommended in all possible directions, the bill was introduced again and became an act of parliament without laughter or opposition.

We did not put on the Cathedral clock [Cathedral of The Assumption, Thurles] until after the devotions on Sunday night, because we did not know on the previous Sunday whether the act would apply to Ireland, and so we could not forewarn the people about the change in the hours of the services. The people in the towns fell in with the change without demur and everything went on just as before. We altered nothing except the hands of the clock. Some of the country people kept to the old time except on Sunday, when they had to go to Mass an hour earlier.

It did not suit the country parts as much as the towns, because the morning is not a good time for saving hay or carrying on harvesting operations, the evening is much better, so if the men stopped work at six o’clock by the new time they would leave off when the hay or corn was in the best condition to be put together or cut down. On dairy farms too, the milkers who had to rise at 4:30 or 5:00 o’clock by the old time, would have to part with their beds at an unearthly hour by the new reckoning.

In towns on the other hand it suited admirably because it gave a long bright evening to the populace after shops were closed and work abandoned. It made no difference to the clergy except that the 12:00 o’clock Mass in towns was much more convenient according to the new regulations.”

Roll on those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer!

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National Pilgrim Paths Week In Tipperary Begins

National Pilgrim Paths Week in Tipperary – March 22nd to March 29th, 2016

Over the coming Easter 2016 period, thousands of Irish residents and foreign visitors are expected to retrace ancestral heritage as they take to Ireland’s ancient pilgrim paths to celebrate the inaugural National Pilgrim Paths Week. This Easter Festival will see a nationwide series of pilgrim walks taking place on Ireland’s medieval penitential trails. Knowledgeable local guides will lead each event, outline the story of the route and explain how medieval penitents coped with their arduous and often dangerous journeys.

Pilgrim-launch

Pictured above, taken at the launch of Pilgrim Paths Week, shows (L – R): John G O’Dwyer (Thurles), Chairman of Pilgrim Paths Ireland; Diarmaid Conden, Knockmealdown Active; Isabel Cambie, Manager South Tipperary Development Company; Mark Rylands, Knockmealdown Active; Beatrice Kelly, Heritage Council and John Egan ( Drom & Inch), Secretary of Pilgrim Paths Ireland.

Speaking at the launch of the new festival, Chairman of Pilgrim Paths Ireland, Mr John G O’Dwyer stated; “National Pilgrim Paths Week was created to raise awareness and use of Ireland’s historic pilgrim routes. The event is targeted, not only at those who enjoy exploring Ireland’s ancient tracks, but also the growing number of people seeking to escape from the daily grind of life and take some time out to reflect and enjoy the outdoors.

The medieval pilgrimage was originally a journey combining prayer and sacrifice – with an element of physical discomfort – by which the pilgrim could become closer to God. In recent times, there has been a renewed interest in following the footsteps of pilgrims past and over the last number of years we in Pilgrim Paths Ireland have worked to develop these routes for the enjoyment of walkers and pilgrims alike.”

Upcoming Events In Tipperary
St. Declan’s Way: In Co Tipperary two pilgrim walks are planned for Holy Saturday, March 26th. Knockmealdown Active will retrace the footsteps of St. Declan over the scenic Knockmealdown Mountains on the border of Tipperary and Waterford. St. Declan’s Way is an ancient pilgrimage route linking the 5th century monastery of St. Declan in Ardmore, County Waterford with Cashel in County Tipperary. This event commences from Mount Melleray Abbey at 11:00am. For further information contact Kevin O’Donnell on Mobile (086) 354 1700.

Kilcommon Pilgrim Loop: On Kilcommon Pilgrim Loop the event will commence at 12:30 pm from Kilcommon Community Hall, with registration and a ‘Welcome Lecture’ by Fr. Dan Woods, P.P., (Kilcommon Parish), on the spiritual heritage of the walking route and the surrounding landscape. Further details available here by telephoning (062) 78103.

To find out more about these two events and the nationwide series of walks for National Pilgrim Paths Week, go to website www.pilgrimpath.ie

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Increased Recycling Charges For Tipperary From July

Do you want your ‘Lobbyists’ washed down?

“The other day the old landlord came by for his rent; I told him no money I had.
Besides, t’wasn’t fair to ask me to pay; the times were so awfully bad.
He felt discontent at not getting his rent and he shook his big head with a frown.
Says he, “I’ll take half,” but says I with a laugh, “Do you want your (‘Lobbyists’) old lobby washed down?”

The traditional Irish folk-song “Do You Want Your Old Lobby Washed Down” appears to have first originated on the borders of counties Tipperary and Cork. Traditionally, ‘washing down a lobby’ was an alternative method of payment of your rent if money was scarce; the equivalent in later years of washing dishes at a restaurant, should you find yourself unable to afford your already consumed meal.

In the lyrics of this old song these words, depending on your particular mindset, are seen as perhaps being an intended double entendre. (‘Double Entendre’, meaning a figure of speech in which a phrase could be misunderstood to be somewhat risqué.)

Waste1

New Recycling Regulation

Increased Recycling Charges
The Minister for Privatising Irish Water, Tipperary’s most ambitious Mr Alan Kelly, has signed off on plans to make people pay for every kilo of waste they produce; including the contents of our green bins. Most of us I suspect have been notified about this fact over the past seven days, with correspondence arriving from our waste disposal companies.

It would appear that not only is Mr Kelly looking for his own P45, but also seeking P45’s for his Fine Gael and other Labour Party colleagues in the forth coming general election.

Mr Kelly and his Labour / Fine Gael colleagues are being adamant on the doorsteps, that they never increased taxes on the Irish people during their soon to end term in office. Flat Taxes, introduced during a period of austerity, i.e. like Water Charges, Property Charges, Bin Charges and now the promised new Increased Recycling Charges, forced on people with no ability to pay, it seems are simply that, “Charges” not taxes. (Thank God the elderly got that €3 per week in their Old Age Pensions.)

Lobbyists or Government, who is to blame?
Was Mr Kelly advised to break this news before a general election by his loaned advisor Mr Cónán O’Broin or by his permanent adviser Mr Jim McGrath, latter reportedly earning jointly some €159,000, or did he just decide to ‘blab’ without their knowledge? So who is behind this new tax increase being imposed on the Irish people, including working people, families and communities? Was it ‘Lobbyists’ representing Waste Disposal Companies wearing a track in Mr Kelly’s plush carpeted office or was it our present coalition cabinet desperately seeking something that could take another tax hike? Lets face it, further taxing on the now essential motor vehicle would have been out of the question.

The plain answer to the above is “I don’t know”, but Mr Kelly does, so ask him yourself when he next appears on your doorstep canvassing. Tomorrow you will be told that this new increased Recycling Charge is a ruse to create long term rural employment.

One thing we do know down here in rural Ireland; where the buses no longer run and where rural doctors no longer wish to function; the black bags of household rubbish will soon begin to reappear, dumped smugly after dark once again on our rural mountainsides, our rural back lanes and in our uninhabited bog lands.

What has rural Ireland done that they have been neglected, abandoned and deserted by this Labour / Fine Gael Government?  In the words of an old Irish curse / hex and addressed to Mr Kelly ; “Sir, May you find the bees but never the honey.”

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