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“Raw Sewage Unacceptable & Pose Risk To Public Health” – EPA

Repeated delays in the elimination of raw sewage are unacceptable and pose a risk to our environment and public health, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

We are aware that raw sewage and other contaminates are flowing from some areas including the local authority sewage treatment plant in Thurles, directly into the River Suir, both up and downstream. This was confirmed back in late October of this year, by the Director of Services for Water, currently stationed with Tipperary County Council, Mr Marcus O’Connor, who finally admitted that double standards are permitted, when it comes to environmental issues affecting the River Suir here in Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

The Thurles.Info, website have been writing about this issue constantly since 2016, ending up with reporting of the issue, on 16/08/19, to the Office of Environmental Enforcement who have chosen to ignore the issue.

Waste water treatment at 21 of Ireland’s 169 large towns and cities did not meet national and European standards set to protect the environment. This is down from 28 the previous year.

River Suir Thurles

Sewage from the equivalent of 77,000 people in 36 towns and villages is being released into the environment every day without treatment.
The pace of improvements needed to protect our environment and public health is too slow. Raw sewage discharges will continue past 2021 in 13 locations.

The EPA report on Urban Waste Water Treatment in 2018, only released today, shows there have been some improvements in waste water treatment in the past year, including the elimination of discharges of raw sewage from two areas.

However, the pace at which Irish Water is fixing the legacy of deficiencies in Ireland’s waste water treatment infrastructure is too slow, and many areas continue to release inadequately treated waste water into the environment. Raw sewage from 36 towns and villages is still released into our coastal waters and rivers today.

Commenting on the report Dr. Tom Ryan, (Director of the EPA’s Office of Environmental Enforcement) has stated: – “Inadequately treated waste water can pollute our environment and is a risk to people’s health. We are seeing repeated delays in providing treatment for many areas and it is not acceptable that 13 towns and villages will still have no waste water treatment by the end of 2021. Irish Water must speed up its delivery of key infrastructure.”

Mr Andy Fanning, (Programme Manager of the EPA’s Office of Environmental Enforcement) has commented that: – “The underlying problem in many cases is a lack of adequate treatment infrastructure. This is a legacy issue which must be solved by investment in new treatment systems. However, some towns that already have the necessary treatment in place did not perform as well as they should. We require Irish Water to continue to improve how it operates and maintains waste water treatment systems to get the best performance from them”.

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Teddy Bear Sleepover In Thurles Library

Ms Suzanne Brosnan (Senior Library Assistant), Tipperary County Council Library Service, reports: –

“Join us in Thurles Library on Tuesday November 26th, at 6.30pm, for our Teddy Bear Sleepover!

Simply bring your Teddy along to the Thurles Library for some bedtime stories, then tuck Teddy in and kiss him goodnight! When the library lights go out later, let’s see what mischief your Teddy gets into!

Each Teddy will receive a tag with their name and when you collect your Teddy the following day in the library, don’t forget to pick up his certificate!

As with all exciting and educational events at Thurles Library, parents are kindly requested to please reserve the expected attendance of your child, in advance, by telephoning 0761-06-6131.”

Note: This event is most suitable for children up to and including first class.

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AmazonBasics Ergonomic Wireless Mouse With Fast Scrolling

AmazonBasics Full-Size Ergonomic Wireless Mouse with Fast Scrolling

Currently being sold at a whopping 42% discount for just £9.99 (Note sterling price) and also note with free delivery on orders dispatched by Amazon of over £20.00. [So, buy 3 and use the other two as stocking filler Christmas Gift for your student children. Or, chip in with two friends anxious to buy at a bargain price.]

Comes Highly Recommended

As a user of this equipment myself, this full-size wireless mouse, with its fast-scrolling, clickable wheel and forward/back thumb buttons which offer fast, easy navigating through large documents and web pages, thus making for enjoyable surfing or project work. This Wireless Connected mouse offers quick, precise results, whether you are shopping online, navigating articles, perusing family photos, or just creating documents for work or for school.

  • Ergonomically designed for right-handed users; its smooth, gently curved profile fits perfectly in the palm of your hand for enhanced comfort.
  • The 2.4 GHz wireless connection; uses a tiny USB receiver that can stay plugged into your computer without obstructing other ports.
  • Laser sensor (1600 DPI resolution) works on most surfaces, including glass; uses 2 AA batteries (included); with a battery LED light and on/off switch for extended battery life.

User-Friendly Controls

The wireless mouse is ready to use right away, providing plug-and-play convenience (no drivers needed) and is compatible with Windows 7, 8, and 10.
Do quickly check out this bargain for yourself HERE, before same is finally withdrawn.

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Thurles – Double Ditch

The world outside your private home is not your personal dump.

Last week I had the privilege, for two days, to show a number of American & Canadian persons around the town of Thurles, all intent on combining together to write a Great Famine TV script. Not having recently visited the “Double Ditch”, on the Mill Road, once a Great Famine project initiated for those starving here in Thurles; imagine my embarrassment on discovering the state of this National Monument.

A National Monument in the Republic of Ireland is a structure or site, the preservation of which has been deemed to be of national importance and therefore worthy of state protection.

Proud people just don’t litter.

This 174 year-old-old famine project has had its Mill Road entrance firstly destroyed by the very contractors employed by Tipperary Co. Council to erect fencing and a short concrete footpath, but now someone has erected posts and barbed wire on this public-right-of-way and once pedestrian Mass Path. It has also been turned into a graveyard for unwanted supermarket trollies. Observe it yourself as I viewed it last week.

“Double Ditch” at Mill Road, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

A ditch is a narrow channel dug at the side of a road or in a field. Its purpose to either hold or carry away flood water.
In Anglo-Saxon, the word ‘dïc’ was pronounced ‘deek’ or ‘deetch’. In digging such a water trench the upcast soil will form into a bank alongside it. This banked soil thus means that the word ‘dïc’ included not just the excavation itself, but also the bank of soil derived from such effort. Later word would later evolve into the words we more commonly use today, e.g. ‘dyke’ and ‘ditch’.

The idea of this Thurles “Double Ditch” was firstly to provide work for those unemployed and starving, but was it also possibly erected to provide a dry shortcut for Dr. J.Knaggs himself, when he was wont to cross from his home, (today’s Ulster Bank premises, in Liberty Square, then known as Main Street); travelling via College Lane, The Pike, (today Kickham Street), to visit family relatives in Knaggs Mill, Brewery and Bakery at Archerstown watermill, same later to become Brady’s Mill?

The Double Ditch featured in our video was built in 1846 and remains a well-worn public right-of-way and also later became a Mass Path to the ‘Lady’s Well’ area. During the 19th and early 20th century same naturally became a short cut for all pupils attending schools in Thurles coming from outlying areas and villages e.g. Littleton.

With next year commemorating the 175th year of the Great Famine, [Same officially began on September 13th, 1845 – 1849], today this video must surely bring a blush of shame, not just to the faces of those we have elected locally to represent us, but also to Tipperary Co. Council officials, who have failed to provide a Recycling Depot in Thurles.
Same depots are readily available in the towns of Cashel, Nenagh, Clonmel, Donohill and Roscrea, but Thurles local councillors have once again failed us in every way, except on their social media pages.
For the few who hold a driving licence to tow a trailer, a rough costing for those who wish to clean up such litter can be found HERE.

Meanwhile, those of our starving ancestors, must surely be turning in their graves due to the disrespect shown in their efforts to feed their children / families.

The gift to the town of fruit bearing crab-apple trees, once secretly sowed by these people bounding on this double ditch, are now set on fire; the existing young shutes of Japanese knotweed, which featured in many a “Spring rhubarb tart” during two world wars, are now forced to emerge through filth and grime. [Yes, we should be controlling Japanese knotweed by eating it, instead of Tipperary Co. Council inviting specialist companies to destroy is using poisonous chemicals and at considerable cost to rate payers.]

The “Double Ditch” featured in the above video gets mentioned for the first time in the “Minutes of the Thurles Famine Food Committee”, on Monday, April 20th, 1846.

Those attending that 1846 meeting included Venerable Archdeacon Rev. Henry Cotton [Chairperson [(C. of I.)]. Present also were Dr. O’Connor, Very Rev. Fr. Barron, [(R.C.) St. Patrick’s College, Thurles], Rev. Mr Baker, Rev. Mr Lanigan, Mr O’Brien [Treasurer], Dr. Joshua Knaggs [Medical Doctor] and Mr James B. Kennedy [Secretary].

From these same minutes we learn that the Famine Relief Committee have already begun creating work for those unemployed, ensuring that money in the form of wages, will enable those starving to purchase food. Dr. Knaggs reports his having inspected the works to be undertaken at College Lane and the proposed “Double Ditch”; calculating the expense for the works at College Lane at £20, latter sum today the equivalent of £20,000.

It was agreed that barrows should be purchased from Mr Patrick McGrath [½doz @ 9 shillings]; Mr Daniel Carroll [½doz @ 9/6] and also Mr Dan Dwyer; latter if he wishes to make them. It was further agreed that, when necessary, the Committee have the power to hire asses’ carts at 15 pence per day.

The previous day, April 19th 1846, Mr J. B. Kennedy Esq had informed relief commissioners of the state of Thurles: –
243 families containing 739 men, women and children unable to work and almost totally destitute; and 525 families containing 2625 individuals totally depending on the heads and sons to the number of 790 who cannot procure employment; thus, making in the town, 3364 persons to be relieved”. With regards to the immediate environs [referred to as ‘country parts’] of the town he states: – “The country parts of our District are divided into wards and similar enquiries are in progress, the result of which I have reason to believe will be painful in the extreme”.

On the same day we learn from further written communication sent to the Trustees appointed for the distribution of Indian Meal, quote: – “In the town of Thurles alone there are at this moment 768 families containing 3364 inhabitants in actual want; of these 739 are old men, women and children, unable to work and who have no one to labour for them; and the remaining 2625 are depending on the daily hire of the sons and heads of the families to the number of 790 able to work and now out of employment”.

The following rules for labourers employed to work on this ‘Double Ditch were adopted: –
(1) Hours of labour to be from 7.00am to 7.00pm with 2 hours for meals.
(2) Any labourer found to shirk from reasonable and fair work or refusing to follow the directions of his overseer shall forthwith be discharged and not admitted to the works again.
(3) That the persons employed shall be paid every evening.
(4) That in case a greater number of labourers shall offer themselves than the funds will enable the committee to pay, a preference shall be given to those who have the largest and most necessitous families”.

Work was ordered to commence on the following Tuesday and quote; “Iron is to be purchased to make 20 crow bars, and 6 picks are also to be purchased”.

It was further agreed that, quote: – “Henceforth there be two rates of payment; 8 pence and 5 pence, and that no boy under 12 years old be employed. That tickets of the form now agreed on, should be printed to admit labourers to work – those for men in black ink and those for boys in red ink; Ordered that 500 red and 500 black tickets be printed. Families containing 7 members and over and having 2 men over 17 shall at the discretion of Committee be entitled to 2 black tickets; Families having a less number shall, if the Committee wish, get 2 tickets, one red and one black”.

Yes, expect tourists and visiting footfall to flood Liberty Square soon, but in what century I do not know.

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Halloween Ghosts Specific To Ériu

No, our H1 heading does not denote a spelling mistake to which we admit to being often prone. Our modern Irish ‘Éire’ initially evolved from an old Irish word ‘Ériu’. Ériu was the name of a Gaelic goddess, same believed to have been the matron goddess of a sovereign Ireland, or possibly a goddess of the land.

Have you ever observed a ghost?

Which brings me to news emanating from our sister town of Cashel, Co. Tipperary, (latter just a 20 minute drive from Thurles via the M8 or the R639 [22.3 km] ). We travel next to Cashel Library, situated at St. Francis Abbey, Friar St, Cashel, Co. Tipperary, which will host a number of events over Halloween for both adults and children, thus celebrating this age-old tradition.

Adult Event

It is here that a resident historian and well known designated “Witch”, (latter in day light possibly better known as Ms Maura Barrett), will give a lecture on ‘Halloween Traditions’ and discuss in detail “ghosts” that are specific to Ériu (Ireland).

This event takes will take place on Tuesday 29th of October at 7:00pm and is for adults only. Patrons and other interested parties are invited to come by for a “spell”, and dressing up is both optional and acceptable. This event promises to be a fun but a scary occasion and refreshments will be served.

Children’s Events

Mum and Dad please note: Children will not be forgotten in the same venue with “Halloween Storytime”, all thanks to Children Services Manager Ms Aoife Moore. This latter event will take place on Thursday 31st of October, beginning at 3.30pm sharp. Dressing up as your favourite ghost is suggested.

In addition, they are showing the film “Casper” on Tuesday 29th of October, at 2:30pm and fancy dress is also optional for this most enjoyable of events.

Bookings are essential for all events and can be made by simply calling Cashel Library on Tel: 062 63825, during official opening hours.

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