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Can You Identify This Thurles Area Bird Species?

The Green Linnet (Or Finch)
“One have I marked, the happiest guest, in all this covert of the blest:
Hail to Thee, far above the rest, in joy of voice and pinion.”
!

[Extract from a poem by William Wordsworth – ‘The Green Linnet.’]

Identify the Species Please! [Photographer G. Willoughby]

This rather shy feathered friend appeared today, December 28th, for the first time on a bird table in Templetuohy, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

Persons with an intimate knowledge of birds (Those of the feathered kind I should stress) might like to offer some insight as to its particular species.

The species shown appears to have the beak (bill) of a seed eating bird, since its beak is thicker and stronger than other types of beaks. This could indicate that the species is a member of the Finch family. Finches are the most obvious members with this type of bill, characterised by a broad triangular shape with strong upper and lower mandibles, thus enabling the bird to break into the shells of various seeds.

There are at least 22 species of Finches wintering in Ireland, with more than 140 species, to be found in Europe, Africa, America (North & South) and in Asia.

Could this be a female duller less green Greenfinch slightly anaemic colour wise? We await to hear from those with greater ornithological knowledge.

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4 comments to Can You Identify This Thurles Area Bird Species?

  • Katie

    George. We think it is a ‘BROADBILL’

  • Katie

    George. I showed this story to one of our seniors who has some beautiful books on all types of birds. And actually shows some of them. He thinks it might be a Female Silver Breasted Broadbill or even a Canary someone kept as a pet and it got out. Now George look what you have started on this side of the world. Great Story.

  • Patrick Hayes

    George: Lots of white in that bird. You might consider that it is a ‘leucistic’ variant of some common species. Leucism (partial loss of pigment) is fairly common, especially in the finch family. We have a house finch that visits regularly with a pure, white head. Looks quite a bit like a miniature Bald Eagle. Please review [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucism]. And google for a variety of pictures for leucistic birds.

  • […] respected ornithologists, both local and from abroad, focusing on our recent bird story, have now confirmed that the unusual bird located in Templetuohy, Thurles, Co. Tipperary, is indeed […]

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